abusive


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Related to abusive: Emotionally abusive

a·bu·sive

 (ə-byo͞o′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
1. Characterized by improper or wrongful use: abusive utilization of public funds.
2. Using or containing insulting or hurtful language: finally reprimanded the abusive colleague.
3. Causing physical injury to another: abusive punishment.
4. Relating to or practicing sexual abuse.

a·bu′sive·ly adv.
a·bu′sive·ness n.

abusive

(əˈbjuːsɪv)
adj
1. characterized by insulting or coarse language
2. characterized by maltreatment
3. incorrectly used; corrupt
aˈbusively adv
aˈbusiveness n

a•bu•sive

(əˈbyu sɪv)

adj.
1. using, containing, or characterized by harshly or coarsely insulting language.
2. treating badly or injuriously; mistreating, esp. physically: his abusive treatment of the horse.
3. wrongly used; corrupt: an abusive exercise of power.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
a•bu′sive•ly, adv.
a•bu′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.abusive - expressing offensive reproachabusive - expressing offensive reproach  
offensive - causing anger or annoyance; "offensive remarks"
2.abusive - characterized by physical or psychological maltreatmentabusive - characterized by physical or psychological maltreatment; "abusive punishment"; "argued...that foster homes are abusive"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"

abusive

abusive

adjective
Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
Translations
بَذِيء، مُهِينفاحِش
hrubýsprostýurážlivý
brutalfornærmendefrækgrov
loukkaava
pogrdan
gyalázkodó
svívirîilegur
人を罵倒する
욕설을 퍼붓는
hanlivý
smädlig
ดูถูก
aşağılayıcıhakaret ediciküfürlüküfürlü, ağzı bozuk
nhục mạ

abusive

[əbˈjuːsɪv] ADJ
1. (= offensive) → ofensivo, insultante; [language] → lleno de insultos, injurioso
to be abusive to sbser grosero a algn, decir cosas injuriosas a algn (more frm)
to become abusiveponerse grosero
2. (physically) [person] → que maltrata; [relationship] → de malos tratos
3. (sexually) [person] → que abusa (sexualmente); [relationship] → de abuso sexual
4. [practice] → abusivo

abusive

[əˈbjuːsɪv] adj [person] (verbally)grossier/ière, injurieux/euse; (physically, mentally)violent(e); [language] → grossier/ière, injurieux/euse
abusive behaviour → comportement violent
to become abusive (verbally)
When I refused, he became abusive → Quand j'ai refusé, il s'est mis à m'injurier.; (physically)
When I refused, he became abusive → Quand j'ai refusé, il est devenu violent.
children with abusive parents → les enfants maltraités par leurs parents
to be in an abusive relationship → vivre une relation violente

abusive

adjbeleidigend; (Psych) person, relationshipabusiv; abusive languageBeschimpfungen pl, → Beleidigungen pl; children from an abusive homeKinder pl, → die zu Hause missbraucht werden/wurden; to be/become abusive (towards somebody)(jdm gegenüber) beleidigend or ausfallend sein/werden; he muttered something abusiveer murmelte etwas Beleidigendes; to get abusive (towards somebody)(jdm gegenüber) beleidigend or ausfallend werden

abusive

[əbˈjuːsɪv] adj (person) → villano/a; (language) → offensivo/a, ingiurioso/a

abuse

(əˈbjuːz) verb
1. to use wrongly, usually with harmful results. She abused her privileges by taking too long a holiday.
2. to insult or speak roughly to. She abused the servants.
(əˈbjuːs) noun
1. insulting language. He shouted abuse at her.
2. the wrong use of something. This toy has been subjected to a lot of abuse.
aˈbusive (-siv) adjective
using insulting language. He wrote an abusive letter to the manager.
aˈbusively adverb
aˈbusiveness noun

abusive

فاحِش hrubý brutal beleidigend βάναυσος insultante loukkaava injurieux pogrdan ingiurioso 人を罵倒する 욕설을 퍼붓는 grof støtende obelżywy abusivo оскорбительный smädlig ดูถูก küfürlü, ağzı bozuk nhục mạ 侵犯性的

abusive

adj abusivo
References in classic literature ?
He met Robert one day talking to the girl, or walking with her, or bathing with her, or carrying her basket--I don't remember what;--and he became so insulting and abusive that Robert gave him a thrashing on the spot that has kept him comparatively in order for a good while.
The man, who had clearly been drinking, poured forth some abusive language, but he left off knocking the horses about, and taking the reins, got into his cart; meantime our friend had quietly taken a note-book from his pocket, and looking at the name and address painted on the cart, he wrote something down.
Everybody knows this, and the slave knows it best of all; so that he feels that there are ten chances of his finding an abusive and tyrannical master, to one of his finding a considerate and kind one.
After some rubbing of the lower part of his face, and some looking at us with those bad eyes, over his grisly fingers, he made one more address to me, half whining, and half abusive.
This propaganda of politeness has gone so far that to-day the man who is profane or abusive at the telephone, is cut off from the use of it.
Don Quixote rode completely dazed, unable with the aid of all his wits to make out what could be the meaning of these abusive names they called them, and the only conclusion he could arrive at was that there was no good to be hoped for and much evil to be feared.
One may be continually abusive without saying anything just; but one cannot always be laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.
now, pretends to call it by every abusive name he can invent; but though ‘Duke is a tolerable judge, he is a very poor carpenter, let me tell him.
Though unable to walk, she had arrived borne aloft in an armchair (her mode of conveyance for the last five years), as brisk, aggressive, self-satisfied, bolt-upright, loudly imperious, and generally abusive as ever.
Doran's door just after we returned, and she endeavoured to push her way in, uttering very abusive expressions towards my wife, and even threatening her, but I had foreseen the possibility of something of the sort, and I had two police fellows there in private clothes, who soon pushed her out again.
Look here, sir," said I, backing to the door and opening it; "you can be as abusive as you like.
Pittacus was the author of some laws, but never drew up any form of government; one of which was this, that if a drunken man beat any person he should be punished more than if he did it when sober; for as people are more apt to be abusive when drunk than sober, he paid no consideration to the excuse which drunkenness might claim, but regarded only the common benefit.