shaken baby syndrome

(redirected from abusive head trauma)
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shaken baby syndrome

also shaken infant syndrome
n.
Brain injury in an infant caused by being violently shaken or tossed, resulting in intracranial swelling and bleeding and subsequent symptoms such as lethargy, seizures, loss of consciousness and often permanent brain damage or death.

shaken baby syndrome

n
(Pathology) a combination of physical injuries and conditions such as brain damage and broken bones, sometimes leading to death, caused by the vigorous shaking of an infant or young child

shak′en ba′by syn`drome


n.
a condition occurring in infants less than one year old, caused by a violent shaking by the arms and shoulders that makes the brain whip back and forth in the skull, causing subdural hematomas and bleeding in the eyes.
[1990–95]
References in periodicals archive ?
Abusive head trauma (AHT), sometimes referred to as "shaken baby syndrome", is the leading cause of death among children who are abused.
Shaken baby syndrome is, a subset of the broader form of child abuse termed abusive head trauma.
Abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants can be difficult to diagnose in an emergency room setting because they may not exhibit overt signs of brain injury and are unable to provide a verbal history.
Child abuse sourcebook; basic consumer health information about child neglect and the physical, sexual, and emotional abuse of children, including abusive head trauma, bullying.
Doctors diagnosed the baby with abusive head trauma and he died two days later.
SBS, also called abusive head trauma, occurs when a person holds a baby too tightly and shakes it, or slams the child into hard surfaces.
Other causes include abusive head trauma, including shaken baby syndrome.
DIAGNOSIS, IN ABUSIVE HEAD TRAUMA IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN: A MEDICAL,
This third edition contains new chapters on abusive head trauma, interviewing child victims of sexual abuse, adolescent sexual assault, unusual manifestations of abuse and neglect, pathology seen in fatal child abuse, and neurobiology and the long-term effects of early abuse.
SAN DIEGO -- Two federally funded studies are underway to test the effectiveness of abusive head trauma prevention efforts in Pennsylvania and in North Carolina.
The couple were arrested in March 2003 after a lengthy investigation found the cause of death to be abusive head trauma.
Alice Newton, medical director of the Child Protection Team at Boston Children's Hospital, diagnosed the girl as a victim of abusive head trauma, which she said includes injuries caused by violent shaking and by striking the head or causing the head to strike another object or surface.