acceptation

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ac·cep·ta·tion

 (ăk′sĕp-tā′shən)
n.
1. The usual or accepted meaning, as of a word or expression: In one of its acceptations value is a technical term in music.
2. Favorable reception; approval.

acceptation

(ˌæksɛpˈteɪʃən)
n
(Linguistics) the accepted meaning, as of a word, phrase, etc

ac•cep•ta•tion

(ˌæk sɛpˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the usual or accepted meaning of a word, phrase, etc.
2. favorable regard; approval.
3. belief; acceptance as valid or true.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acceptation - acceptance as true or validacceptation - acceptance as true or valid    
acceptance - the state of being acceptable and accepted; "torn jeans received no acceptance at the country club"
2.acceptation - the accepted meaning of a wordacceptation - the accepted meaning of a word  
signified, sense - the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted; "the dictionary gave several senses for the word"; "in the best sense charity is really a duty"; "the signifier is linked to the signified"
3.acceptation - the act of accepting with approvalacceptation - the act of accepting with approval; favorable reception; "its adoption by society"; "the proposal found wide acceptance"
embrace, bosom - a close affectionate and protective acceptance; "his willing embrace of new ideas"; "in the bosom of the family"
approval, approving, blessing - the formal act of approving; "he gave the project his blessing"; "his decision merited the approval of any sensible person"

acceptation

noun
That which is signified by a word or expression:
Translations

acceptation

[ˌæksepˈteɪʃən] Nacepción f

acceptation

n (old, form, of word) → Bedeutung f
References in classic literature ?
Vain and egotistical, supple and proud, libertine and gourmand, grasping from the pressure of debt, discreet as a tomb out of which nought issues to contradict the epitaph intended for the passer's eye, bold and fearless when soliciting, good-natured and witty in all acceptations of the word, a timely jester, full of tact, knowing how to compromise others by a glance or a nudge, shrinking from no mudhole, but gracefully leaping it, intrepid Voltairean, yet punctual at mass if a fashionable company could be met in Saint Thomas Aquinas,--such a man as this secretary- general resembled, in one way or another, all the mediocrities who form the kernel of the political world.
But I deny that I can abstract from one another, or conceive separately, those qualities which it is impossible should exist so separated; or that I can frame a general notion, by abstracting from particulars in the manner aforesaid--which last are the two proper acceptations of ABSTRACTION.
It is enough to say, without applying this poetical rhapsody to Aouda, that she was a charming woman, in all the European acceptation of the phrase.
And Stepan Arkadyevitch was not merely an honest man--unemphatically--in the common acceptation of the words, he was an honest man--emphatically--in that special sense which the word has in Moscow, when they talk of an "honest" politician, an "honest" writer, an "honest" newspaper, an "honest" institution, an "honest" tendency, meaning not simply that the man or the institution is not dishonest, but that they are capable on occasion of taking a line of their own in opposition to the authorities.
Because he had voluntarily relinquished a title that was distasteful to him, and a station that was distasteful to him, and had left his country--he submitted before the word emigrant in the present acceptation by the Tribunal was in use--to live by his own industry in England, rather than on the industry of the overladen people of France.
Dick Kennedy was a Scotchman, in the full acceptation of the word--open, resolute, and headstrong.
We are just beginning to discern that certain conceptions of our relations to our fellow-men, once formulated in generalities which met with a dramatic acceptation from the world, and were then rejected by it as mere rhetoric, have really a vital truth in them, and that if they have ever seemed false it was because of the false conditions in which we still live.
We are not even friends, in the ordinary acceptation of the word.
Not only had he put himself beyond the pale of human laws, but he had made himself independent of them, free in the strictest acceptation of the word, quite beyond their reach
To say that Ralph loved or cared for--in the most ordinary acceptation of those terms--any one of God's creatures, would be the wildest fiction.
A house in Lant Street would not come within the denomination of a first-rate residence, in the strict acceptation of the term; but it is a most desirable spot nevertheless.