acciaccatura

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acciaccatura
left: C note without acciaccatura
bottom: C note with acciaccatura

ac·ciac·ca·tu·ra

 (ä-chä′kə-to͝or′ə)
n. Music
An ornament note that is one half step or one whole step higher or lower than a principal note and is sounded at the same time as the principal note, adding dissonance to a harmony.

[Italian, a crushing, acciaccatura, from acciaccare, to crush, weaken, from acciacco, ailment, from Spanish achaque, ailment, defect, excuse, from achacar, to blame, from Arabic al-šakwa, the complaint : al-, the + šakwa, complaint, grievance (from šakā, to complain, suffer).]

acciaccatura

(ɑːˌtʃɑːkɑːˈtʊərə)
n, pl -ras or -re (-reɪ; -riː)
1. (Classical Music) a small grace note melodically adjacent to a principal note and played simultaneously with or immediately before it
2. (Classical Music) (in modern music) a very short appoggiatura
[C18: Italian: literally, a crushing sound]

ac•ciac•ca•tu•ra

(əˌtʃɑ kəˈtʊər ə)

n., pl. -tu•ras, -tu•re (-ˈtʊər eɪ, -ˈtʊər i)
a short grace note one half step below, and struck at the same time as, a principal note.
[1875–80; < Italian: literally, a pounding, crushing =acciacc(are) to crush, bruise + -atura (see -ate1, -ure)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acciaccatura - an embellishing note usually written in smaller sizeacciaccatura - an embellishing note usually written in smaller size
musical note, note, tone - a notation representing the pitch and duration of a musical sound; "the singer held the note too long"
Translations
acciaccatura
References in periodicals archive ?
These gruppetti or turns, these quick appoggiature and acciaccature ('two rapid descending notes ornamenting a third note'), these repeated or staccato sounds, and, perhaps most important of all, the perfect shake or trill, must be at the command of the thoroughly-trained vocalist.
R1 chose a texture of five to nine parts, complete with acciaccature for a solo aria, and Antonio Tonelli went to similar lengths in what is probably the single most important source for Corellian continuo.
Only rarely does he depart from a chordal style; very few embellishments of the texture, such as rhythmic arpeggios or written-out trills, can be found; and there are no acciaccature or diminutions.