accompaniment


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ac·com·pa·ni·ment

 (ə-kŭm′pə-nē-mənt, ə-kŭmp′nē-)
n.
1. Music A vocal or instrumental part that supports another, often solo, part.
2. Something, such as a situation, that accompanies something else; a concomitant.
3. Something added for embellishment, completeness, or symmetry; complement.

accompaniment

(əˈkʌmpənɪmənt; əˈkʌmpnɪ-)
n
1. something that accompanies or is served or used with something else
2. something inessential or subsidiary that is added, as for ornament or symmetry
3. (Classical Music) music a subordinate part for an instrument, voices, or an orchestra

ac•com•pa•ni•ment

(əˈkʌm pə nɪ mənt, əˈkʌmp nɪ-)

n.
1. something incidental or added for ornament, symmetry, etc.
2. a musical part supporting and enhancing the principal part.
[1725–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accompaniment - an event or situation that happens at the same time as or in connection with another
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
associate - any event that usually accompanies or is closely connected with another; "first was the lightning and then its thunderous associate"
background - relatively unimportant or inconspicuous accompanying situation; "when the rain came he could hear the sound of thunder in the background"
2.accompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical partsaccompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical parts
part, voice - the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part"
descant, discant - a decorative musical accompaniment (often improvised) added above a basic melody
vamp - an improvised musical accompaniment
3.accompaniment - something added to complete or embellish or make perfect; "a fine wine is a perfect complement to the dinner"; "wild rice was served as an accompaniment to the main dish"
adjunct - something added to another thing but not an essential part of it
4.accompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect themaccompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect them
protection - the activity of protecting someone or something; "the witnesses demanded police protection"
convoy - the act of escorting while in transit

accompaniment

noun
1. backing music, backing, support, obbligato He sang to the musical director's piano accompaniment.
2. supplement, extra, addition, extension, companion, accessory, complement, decoration, frill, adjunct, appendage, adornment The recipe makes a good accompaniment to ice-cream.

accompaniment

noun
1. One that accompanies another:
2. Something added to another for embellishment or completion:
Translations
مُرَافَقَة، مُصَاحَبَه
segona
doprovod
akkompagnement
undirleikur
spremljava
eşlikeşlik eden

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] N (also Mus) → acompañamiento m
they marched to the accompaniment of a military banddesfilaban al compás de una banda militar

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] n
(musical, sound)accompagnement m
to the accompaniment of [+ cheers, shouting] → au son de
(= food, drink) → accompagnement m

accompaniment

nBegleitung f (also Mus); with piano accompanimentmit Klavierbegleitung; to the accompaniment ofbegleitet von

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpnɪmənt] n (also) (Mus) → accompagnamento

accompany

(əˈkampəni) verb
1. to go with (someone or something). He accompanied her to the door.
2. to play a musical instrument to go along with (a singer etc). He accompanied her on the piano.
acˈcompaniment noun
something that accompanies. I'll play the piano accompaniment while you sing.
acˈcompanist noun
a person who plays a musical accompaniment.
References in classic literature ?
No one but Beth could get much music out of the old piano, but she had a way of softly touching the yellow keys and making a pleasant accompaniment to the simple songs they sang.
It would seem long practice had rendered this manual accompaniment necessary; for it did not cease until the preposition which the poet had selected for the close of his verse had been duly delivered like a word of two syllables.
From the friends of Spear there was a ripple of applause, which no tipstaff took it upon himself to suppress, and to the accompaniment of this, Mr.
Be the cause what it may, this little, quiet, never-ceasing throb of Time's pulse, repeating its small strokes with such busy regularity, in Judge Pyncheon's motionless hand, has an effect of terror, which we do not find in any other accompaniment of the scene.
breaking moreover into a happy laugh which, immediately after, as if it were a vocal accompaniment, he prolonged into incoherent, extravagant song.
Clare sat down to the piano, and began playing a soft and melancholy movement with the AEolian accompaniment.
Visit the Navy Yard, and behold a marine, such a man as an American government can make, or such as it can make a man with its black arts--a mere shadow and reminiscence of humanity, a man laid out alive and standing, and already, as one may say, buried under arms with funeral accompaniment, though it may be,
The droning voice droned on; a soft snoring arose on all sides and supported it like a deep and subdued accompaniment of wind instruments.
One accompaniment to her song took her agreeably by surprizea second, slightly but correctly taken by Frank Churchill.
Many a time I have shared between two claimants the precious morsel of brown bread distributed at tea-time; and after relinquishing to a third half the contents of my mug of coffee, I have swallowed the remainder with an accompaniment of secret tears, forced from me by the exigency of hunger.
All this he did, methodically, and with as loud and harsh an accompaniment of noise as he could make.
He longed to see the curious table-napkins wrought for the Priest of the Sun, on which were displayed all the dainties and viands that could be wanted for a feast; the mortuary cloth of King Chilperic, with its three hundred golden bees; the fantastic robes that excited the indignation of the Bishop of Pontus and were figured with "lions, panthers, bears, dogs, forests, rocks, hunters--all, in fact, that a painter can copy from nature"; and the coat that Charles of Orleans once wore, on the sleeves of which were embroidered the verses of a song beginning "Madame, je suis tout joyeux," the musical accompaniment of the words being wrought in gold thread, and each note, of square shape in those days, formed with four pearls.