accompaniment

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ac·com·pa·ni·ment

 (ə-kŭm′pə-nē-mənt, ə-kŭmp′nē-)
n.
1. Music A vocal or instrumental part that supports another, often solo, part.
2. Something, such as a situation, that accompanies something else; a concomitant.
3. Something added for embellishment, completeness, or symmetry; complement.

accompaniment

(əˈkʌmpənɪmənt; əˈkʌmpnɪ-)
n
1. something that accompanies or is served or used with something else
2. something inessential or subsidiary that is added, as for ornament or symmetry
3. (Classical Music) music a subordinate part for an instrument, voices, or an orchestra

ac•com•pa•ni•ment

(əˈkʌm pə nɪ mənt, əˈkʌmp nɪ-)

n.
1. something incidental or added for ornament, symmetry, etc.
2. a musical part supporting and enhancing the principal part.
[1725–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accompaniment - an event or situation that happens at the same time as or in connection with another
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
associate - any event that usually accompanies or is closely connected with another; "first was the lightning and then its thunderous associate"
background - relatively unimportant or inconspicuous accompanying situation; "when the rain came he could hear the sound of thunder in the background"
2.accompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical partsaccompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical parts
part, voice - the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part"
descant, discant - a decorative musical accompaniment (often improvised) added above a basic melody
vamp - an improvised musical accompaniment
3.accompaniment - something added to complete or embellish or make perfect; "a fine wine is a perfect complement to the dinner"; "wild rice was served as an accompaniment to the main dish"
adjunct - something added to another thing but not an essential part of it
4.accompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect themaccompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect them
protection - the activity of protecting someone or something; "the witnesses demanded police protection"
convoy - the act of escorting while in transit

accompaniment

noun
1. backing music, backing, support, obbligato He sang to the musical director's piano accompaniment.
2. supplement, extra, addition, extension, companion, accessory, complement, decoration, frill, adjunct, appendage, adornment The recipe makes a good accompaniment to ice-cream.

accompaniment

noun
1. One that accompanies another:
2. Something added to another for embellishment or completion:
Translations
مُرَافَقَة، مُصَاحَبَه
segona
doprovod
akkompagnement
undirleikur
spremljava
eşlikeşlik eden

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] N (also Mus) → acompañamiento m
they marched to the accompaniment of a military banddesfilaban al compás de una banda militar

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] n
(musical, sound)accompagnement m
to the accompaniment of [+ cheers, shouting] → au son de
(= food, drink) → accompagnement m

accompaniment

nBegleitung f (also Mus); with piano accompanimentmit Klavierbegleitung; to the accompaniment ofbegleitet von

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpnɪmənt] n (also) (Mus) → accompagnamento

accompany

(əˈkampəni) verb
1. to go with (someone or something). He accompanied her to the door.
2. to play a musical instrument to go along with (a singer etc). He accompanied her on the piano.
acˈcompaniment noun
something that accompanies. I'll play the piano accompaniment while you sing.
acˈcompanist noun
a person who plays a musical accompaniment.
References in classic literature ?
The mother played her accompaniments and at the same time watched her daughter with greedy admiration and nervous apprehension.
Duncan caught from these natural accompaniments of the solitary scene a glimmering of hope; and he began to rally his faculties to renewed exertions, with something like a reviving confidence of success.
This latter circumstance, with its own particular accompaniments, forming what may be called the secret part of the tragedy about to be narrated, never reached the ears of Captain Ahab or his mates.
Starbuck was an honest, upright man; but out of Starbuck's heart, at that instant when he saw the muskets, there strangely evolved an evil thought; but so blent with its neutral or good accompaniments that for the instant he hardly knew it for itself.
To go on to another item--one of the necessary accompaniments of capitalism in a democracy is political corruption; and one of the consequences of civic administration by ignorant and vicious politicians, is that preventable diseases kill off half our population.
At the brick house she practiced scales and exercises, but at the Cobbs' cabinet organ she sang like a bird, improvising simple accompaniments that seemed to her ignorant auditors nothing short of marvelous.
The event of the day--that is, the return of Diana and Mary--pleased him; but the accompaniments of that event, the glad tumult, the garrulous glee of reception irked him: I saw he wished the calmer morrow was come.
The play began, with all the proper accompaniments of a theatrical performance in private life; with a crowded audience, an African temperature, a bursting of heated lamp-glasses, and a difficulty in drawing up the curtain.
With these accompaniments we were left alone to finish the evening, my aunt sitting opposite to me drinking her wine and water; soaking her strips of toast in it, one by one, before eating them; and looking benignantly on me, from among the borders of her nightcap.
The distant appearance of this huge building, with these singular accompaniments, is as interesting to the lovers of the picturesque, as the interior of the castle is to the eager antiquary, whose imagination it carries back to the days of the heptarchy.
know of a certainty that all these annoyances are very necessary accompaniments of the calling of arms, I would lay me down here to die of pure vexation.
She was so little equal to Rebecca's puddings and Rebecca's hashes, brought to table, as they all were, with such accompaniments of half-cleaned plates, and not half-cleaned knives and forks, that she was very often constrained to defer her heartiest meal till she could send her brothers in the evening for biscuits and buns.