accompany


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ac·com·pa·ny

 (ə-kŭm′pə-nē, ə-kŭmp′nē)
v. ac·com·pa·nied, ac·com·pa·ny·ing, ac·com·pa·nies
v.tr.
1. To be or go with, especially as a companion.
2. To provide with an addition; supplement: a dish that is best accompanied with a robust wine.
3. To exist or occur at the same time as: dark clouds that were accompanied by rain.
4. Music To perform an accompaniment to.
v.intr.
Music To play an accompaniment.

[Middle English accompanien, from Old French acompagnier : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + compaignon, companion; see companion1.]
Synonyms: accompany, conduct, escort, chaperone
These verbs mean to be with or to go with another or others. Accompany suggests going with another on an equal basis: "One day [my wife] accompanied me, upon some household errand, into the cellar of the old building which our poverty compelled us to inhabit" (Edgar Allan Poe).
Conduct implies guidance of others: "A servant conducted me to my bedroom" (Charlotte Brontë).
Escort stresses protective guidance or official action: "At every county town a long cavalcade of the principal gentlemen ... escorted the mayor to the market cross" (Thomas Macaulay).
Chaperone specifies adult supervision of young persons: My mother helped chaperone the prom.

accompany

(əˈkʌmpənɪ; əˈkʌmpnɪ)
vb, -nies, -nying or -nied
1. (tr) to go along with, so as to be in company with or escort
2. (foll by: with) to supplement: the food is accompanied with a very hot mango pickle.
3. (tr) to occur, coexist, or be associated with
4. (Classical Music) to provide a musical accompaniment for (a performer)
[C15: from Old French accompaignier, from compaing companion1]
acˈcompanier n

ac•com•pa•ny

(əˈkʌm pə ni)

v. -nied, -ny•ing. v.t.
1. to go along or in company with.
2. to exist or occur in association with: Thunder accompanies lightning.
3. to cause to be associated with or attended by: He accompanied his speech with gestures.
4. to perform musical accompaniment for.
v.i.
5. to provide the musical accompaniment.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French accompagnier. See ac-, company]
syn: accompany, attend, convoy, escort mean to go along with. To accompany is to go as an associate or companion, usu. on equal terms: My daughter accompanied me on the trip. attend usu. implies going along as a subordinate, as to render service: to attend the queen. To convoy is to accompany ships or other vehicles with an armed guard: to convoy a fleet of merchant vessels. To escort is to accompany in order to protect or show courtesy: to escort a visiting dignitary.

accompany

If you accompany someone to a place, you go there with them.

She asked me to accompany her to the church.

Accompany is a fairly formal word. In conversation and in less formal writing, you use go with or come with.

I went with my friends to see what it looked like.
He wished Ellen had come with him.

However, there is no passive form of go with or come with. If you want to use a passive form, you must use accompany.

He was accompanied by his wife.
She came out of the house accompanied by Mrs Jones.

accompany


Past participle: accompanied
Gerund: accompanying

Imperative
accompany
accompany
Present
I accompany
you accompany
he/she/it accompanies
we accompany
you accompany
they accompany
Preterite
I accompanied
you accompanied
he/she/it accompanied
we accompanied
you accompanied
they accompanied
Present Continuous
I am accompanying
you are accompanying
he/she/it is accompanying
we are accompanying
you are accompanying
they are accompanying
Present Perfect
I have accompanied
you have accompanied
he/she/it has accompanied
we have accompanied
you have accompanied
they have accompanied
Past Continuous
I was accompanying
you were accompanying
he/she/it was accompanying
we were accompanying
you were accompanying
they were accompanying
Past Perfect
I had accompanied
you had accompanied
he/she/it had accompanied
we had accompanied
you had accompanied
they had accompanied
Future
I will accompany
you will accompany
he/she/it will accompany
we will accompany
you will accompany
they will accompany
Future Perfect
I will have accompanied
you will have accompanied
he/she/it will have accompanied
we will have accompanied
you will have accompanied
they will have accompanied
Future Continuous
I will be accompanying
you will be accompanying
he/she/it will be accompanying
we will be accompanying
you will be accompanying
they will be accompanying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been accompanying
you have been accompanying
he/she/it has been accompanying
we have been accompanying
you have been accompanying
they have been accompanying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been accompanying
you will have been accompanying
he/she/it will have been accompanying
we will have been accompanying
you will have been accompanying
they will have been accompanying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been accompanying
you had been accompanying
he/she/it had been accompanying
we had been accompanying
you had been accompanying
they had been accompanying
Conditional
I would accompany
you would accompany
he/she/it would accompany
we would accompany
you would accompany
they would accompany
Past Conditional
I would have accompanied
you would have accompanied
he/she/it would have accompanied
we would have accompanied
you would have accompanied
they would have accompanied
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.accompany - be present or associated with an event or entityaccompany - be present or associated with an event or entity; "French fries come with the hamburger"; "heart attacks are accompanied by distruction of heart tissue"; "fish usually goes with white wine"; "this kind of vein accompanies certain arteries"
collocate with, construe with, cooccur with, co-occur with, go with - go or occur together; "The word 'hot' tends to cooccur with 'cold'"
attend - to accompany as a circumstance or follow as a result; "Menuhin's playing was attended by a 15-minute standing ovation"
rule - have an affinity with; of signs of the zodiac
2.accompany - go or travel along withaccompany - go or travel along with; "The nurse accompanied the old lady everywhere"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
walk - accompany or escort; "I'll walk you to your car"
consort, run - keep company; "the heifers run with the bulls to produce offspring"
escort - accompany as an escort; "She asked her older brother to escort her to the ball"
escort, see - accompany or escort; "I'll see you to the door"
tag along - go along with, often uninvited; "my younger brother often tagged along when I went out with my friends"
3.accompany - perform an accompaniment toaccompany - perform an accompaniment to; "The orchestra could barely follow the frequent pitch changes of the soprano"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
play - play on an instrument; "The band played all night long"
4.accompany - be a companion to somebodyaccompany - be a companion to somebody    
affiliate, assort, consort, associate - keep company with; hang out with; "He associates with strange people"; "She affiliates with her colleagues"

accompany

verb
1. go with, lead, partner, protect, guide, attend, conduct, escort, shepherd, convoy, usher, chaperon Ken agreed to accompany me on a trip to Africa.
2. occur with, belong to, come with, supplement, coincide with, join with, coexist with, go together with, follow, go cheek by jowl with This volume of essays was designed to accompany an exhibition.
3. back, support, play for, play with, back up He accompanies her on all but one song.

accompany

verb
To be with or go with (another):
Obsolete: consort.
Idiom: go hand in hand with.
Translations
يُرَافِقيُرافِقُيُرَافِق فِي العَزْف
doprovoditdoprovázet
ledsageakkompagnerefølge
tulla mukaan
pratiti
kísér
fylgjaleika undir meî
同行する
동행하다
akompaniatoriusakompanimentasakompanuotilydėtipalydėti
pavadīt
spremitispremljati
följa med
ไปเป็นเพื่อน
eşlik etmekbirlikte gitmek
đi cùng

accompany

[əˈkʌmpənɪ] VT
1. (= escort) → acompañar
to be accompanied by sbir acompañado de algn
2. (fig) → acompañar
accompanied byacompañado de
he accompanied this with a grimaceesto lo dijo acompañado de una mueca, al decir esto hizo una mueca
accompanying lettercarta f adjunta
3. (Mus) → acompañar (on the violin/piano con el violín/al piano) to accompany o.s. on the pianoacompañarse al piano

accompany

[əˈkʌmpəni] vt
(= escort) → accompagner
(= complement) → accompagner
(music)accompagneraccompanying letter [əˈkʌmpəniɪŋ] nlettre f d'accompagnement

accompany

vtbegleiten (also Mus); pork is often accompanied by apple sauceSchweinefleisch wird oft mit Apfelmus (als Beilage) serviert; to accompany oneself (Mus) → sich selbst begleiten; accompanying letterBegleitschreiben nt

accompany

[əˈkʌmpnɪ] vt (gen) → accompagnare (Mus) to accompany (on)accompagnare (a)

accompany

(əˈkampəni) verb
1. to go with (someone or something). He accompanied her to the door.
2. to play a musical instrument to go along with (a singer etc). He accompanied her on the piano.
acˈcompaniment noun
something that accompanies. I'll play the piano accompaniment while you sing.
acˈcompanist noun
a person who plays a musical accompaniment.

accompany

يُرافِقُ doprovodit ledsage begleiten συνοδεύω acompañar tulla mukaan accompagner pratiti accompagnare 同行する 동행하다 begeleiden følge towarzyszyć acompanhar сопровождать följa med ไปเป็นเพื่อน eşlik etmek đi cùng 陪同

accompany

v. acompañar.
References in classic literature ?
Damon said," he went on while arranging his papers, "he met me on the train, and he was so taken by the story of the idol of gold that he agreed to accompany me to Central America.
If a young man with an idea can once get Jim Burden's attention, can manage to accompany him when he goes off into the wilds hunting for lost parks or exploring new canyons, then the money which means action is usually forthcoming.
Madame Ratignolle begged Robert to accompany her to the house; she complained of cramp in her limbs and stiffness of the joints.
He opposed their ready suggestion to return to Devil's Ford with a new and unnecessary inflexibility: he even met their compromise to accompany him to Sacramento with equal decision.
I was aware afresh, with her, as we went, of how, like her brother, she contrived--it was the charming thing in both children--to let me alone without appearing to drop me and to accompany me without appearing to surround.
no baggage, not a hat-box, valise, or carpet-bag, --no friends accompany him to the wharf with their adieux.
Once he made bold to ask Marija to accompany him to such a party, and Marija accepted, to his great delight--after which he never went anywhere without her, while if the celebration were given by friends of his, he would invite the rest of the family also.
There is danger that our humble friend Tom be neglected amid the adventures of the higher born; but, if our readers will accompany us up to a little loft over the stable, they may, perhaps, learn a little of his affairs.
I looked about me for the right sort of person to accompany me in the capacity of agent, and finally hired a Mr.
They did not accompany each other to the doors of their chosen victims, feeling sure that together they could not approach the subject seriously; but they parted at the gate of each house, the one holding the horse while the other took the soap samples and interviewed any one who seemed of a coming-on disposition.
Towards this home, she began on the approach of January to turn her thoughts, and thither she one day abruptly, and very unexpectedly by them, asked the elder Misses Dashwood to accompany her.
My landlord halloed for me to stop ere I reached the bottom of the garden, and offered to accompany me across the moor.