accomplice

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Related to accomplices: Aid and abet

ac·com·plice

 (ə-kŏm′plĭs)
n.
One who participates in the commission of a crime without being the principal actor.

[Alteration of complice.]

accomplice

(əˈkɒmplɪs; əˈkʌm-)
n
a person who helps another in committing a crime
[C15: from a complice, interpreted as one word. See complice]

ac•com•plice

(əˈkɒm plɪs)

n.
a person who knowingly helps another in a crime or wrongdoing.
[1475–85; a(c)- of unclear orig. + late Middle English complice < Middle French < Medieval Latin complex, s. complic- partner; see complex]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accomplice - a person who joins with another in carrying out some plan (especially an unethical or illegal plan)accomplice - a person who joins with another in carrying out some plan (especially an unethical or illegal plan)
assistant, helper, help, supporter - a person who contributes to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose; "my invaluable assistant"; "they hired additional help to finish the work"
decoy, steerer - a beguiler who leads someone into danger (usually as part of a plot)

accomplice

noun partner in crime, ally, associate, assistant, companion, accessory, comrade, helper, colleague, collaborator, confederate, henchman, coadjutor, abettor His accomplice was arrested after a high-speed car chase.

accomplice

noun
One who assists a lawbreaker in a wrongful or criminal act:
Translations
شَرِيكٌ في جَرِيـمَةشَرِيك فِي جَرِيمَه
spolupachatelspoluviník
medskyldigmedsammensvoren
rikostoveri
suučesnik
bűnrészesbűntárscinkostettestárs
vitorîsmaîur
complicecorreoaccomplice
共犯者
공범
līdzdalībniekslīdzvainīgais
medbrottsling
ผู้สมรู้ร่วมคิด
tòng phạm

accomplice

[əˈkʌmplɪs] Ncómplice mf

accomplice

[əˈkɒmplɪs əˈkʌmplɪs] ncomplice mf

accomplice

nKomplize m, → Komplizin f, → Mittäter(in) m(f); to be an accomplice to a crimeKomplize bei einem Verbrechen sein, Mittäter eines Verbrechens sein

accomplice

[əˈkʌmplɪs] n accomplice (in)complice m/f (di)

accomplice

(əˈkamplis) , ((American) -ˈkom-) noun
a person who helps another, especially in crime. The thief's accomplice warned him that the police were coming.

accomplice

شَرِيكٌ في جَرِيـمَة spolupachatel medskyldig Komplize συνεργός cómplice rikostoveri complice suučesnik complice 共犯者 공범 medeplichtige medskyldig wspólnik cúmplice сообщник medbrottsling ผู้สมรู้ร่วมคิด suç ortağı tòng phạm 同伙
References in classic literature ?
Lorry and Miss Pross, while engaged in the commission of their deed and in the removal of its traces, almost felt, and almost looked, like accomplices in a horrible crime.
The return of King Richard he spoke of as an event altogether beyond the reach of probability; yet, when he observed, from the doubtful looks and uncertain answers which he received, that this was the apprehension by which the minds of his accomplices were most haunted, he boldly treated that event, should it really take place, as one which ought not to alter their political calculations.
Silver was roundly accused of playing double--of trying to make a separate peace for himself, of sacrificing the interests of his accomplices and victims, and, in one word, of the identical, exact thing that he was doing.
If a governor of New York, therefore, should be at the head of any such conspiracy, until the design had been ripened into actual hostility he could insure his accomplices and adherents an entire impunity.
That is how the world, our friends, and our enemies are the accomplices of our defects!
The trail of Achmet ben Houdin and his accomplices is a matter of record--you may verify it if you care to.
In any case, it is better to perish with it, than be made accomplices in a retaliation the justice of which we cannot judge.
He became involved in a palace intrigue, and only saved himself by betraying his accomplices.
Were the accomplices of Ravaillac or of Jacques Clement ever known?
Therefore I warn you, and listen well to my words, that they may be engraved upon your memory, never to be forgotten: this murder, which has robbed me of everything -- this murder, which has deprived me of my name -- this murder, which has impoverished me -- this murder, which has made me corrupt, wicked, implacable -- I shall summon you to account for it first and then those who were your accomplices, when I discover them
Mademoiselle Thirion's act was, therefore, a decisive stroke, intended by her to force the others into becoming, openly, the accomplices of her hatred.
Whether he had any accomplices, or whatever the thing is called in the law?