accosted


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ac·cost

 (ə-kôst′, ə-kŏst′)
tr.v. ac·cost·ed, ac·cost·ing, ac·costs
1. To approach and speak to, especially aggressively or insistently, as with a demand or request.
2. To approach and speak to with the intent of having sex.

[French accoster, from Old French, from Medieval Latin accostāre, to adjoin : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin costa, side; see kost- in Indo-European roots.]
References in classic literature ?
A HEN who had patiently hatched out a brood of vipers, was accosted by a Swallow, who said: "What a fool you are to give life to creatures who will reward you by destroying you.
A DETECTIVE searching for the murderer of a dead man was accosted by a Clew.
He accosted me with a slight bow, and, edging close to the wall, endeavoured to pass on; but I was not so minded.
When, however, he saw that Rosalie had taken leave of her friends and I was about to join her, he would have left me and passed on at a quicker pace; but, as he civilly lifted his hat in passing her, to my surprise, instead of returning the salute with a stiff, ungracious bow, she accosted him with one of her sweetest smiles, and, walking by his side, began to talk to him with all imaginable cheerfulness and affability; and so we proceeded all three together.
Short Trotters however, being a compound name, inconvenient of use in friendly dialogue, the gentleman on whom it had been bestowed was known among his intimates either as 'Short,' or 'Trotters,' and was seldom accosted at full length as Short Trotters, except in formal conversations and on occasions of ceremony.
I quickly followed suit, and descending into the bar-room accosted the grinning landlord very pleasantly.
Going into the Market Place he accosted in a feigned voice a maiden, the orphan daughter of a noble Polygon, whose affection in former days he had sought in vain; and by a series of deceptions -- aided, on the one side, by a string of lucky accidents too long to relate, and on the other, by an almost inconceivable fatuity and neglect of ordinary precautions on the part of the relations of the bride -- he succeeded in consummating the marriage.
One man I approached--he was, I perceived, a neighbour of mine, though I did not know his name--and accosted.
But as the girl timidly accosted him, he gave a convulsive movement and saved his respectability by a vigorous side-step.
Smith-Oldwick's first thought when he was accosted by the figure in the yellow tunic of a soldier was to shoot the man dead and trust to his legs and the dimly lighted, winding streets to permit his escape, for he knew that to be accosted was equivalent to recapture since no inhabitant of this weird city but would recognize him as an alien.
When Jeff arrived, Tom accosted him; and "led up" warily to opportunities for remark about Becky, but the giddy lad never could see the bait.
When they had come within speech (which was just under the maid's eyes) the older man bowed and accosted the other with a very pretty manner of politeness.