Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to accounts: accounts receivable, accounts payable, Accounting Principles, Accounting Concepts


1. A narrative or record of events.
a. A reason given for a particular action or event: What is the account for this loss?
b. A report relating to one's conduct: gave a satisfactory account of herself.
c. A basis or ground: no reason to worry on that account.
a. A formal banking, brokerage, or business relationship established to provide for regular services, dealings, and other financial transactions.
b. A precise list or enumeration of financial transactions.
c. A sum of money deposited for checking, savings, or brokerage use.
d. A customer having a business or credit relationship with a firm: salespeople visiting their accounts.
4. A private access to a computer system or online service, usually requiring a password to enter.
5. Worth, standing, or importance: a landowner of some account.
6. Profit or advantage: turned her writing skills to good account.
tr.v. ac·count·ed, ac·count·ing, ac·counts
To consider as being; deem. See Synonyms at consider. See Usage Note at as1.
Phrasal Verb:
account for
1. To constitute the governing or primary factor in: Bad weather accounted for the long delay.
2. To provide an explanation or justification for: The suspect couldn't account for his time that night.
call to account
1. To challenge or contest.
2. To hold answerable for.
on account
On credit.
on account of
Because of; for the sake of: "We got married on account of the baby" (Anne Tyler).
on no account
Under no circumstances.
on (one's) own account
1. For oneself.
2. On one's own; by oneself: He wants to work on his own account.
on (someone's) account
For someone's benefit: It's nice of you to make such an effort on his account.
take into account
To take into consideration; allow for.

[Middle English, from Old French acont, from aconter, to reckon : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + cunter, to count (from Latin computāre, to sum up; see compute).]


pl n
(Accounting & Book-keeping)
a. a chronological list of debits and credits relating to a specified asset, liability, expense, or income of a business and forming part of the ledger
b. (as modifier): an accounts book.
(Accounting & Book-keeping) another name for accounts department
References in classic literature ?
She tries to learn everything, and really goes to market beyond her years, likewise keeps accounts, with my help, quite wonderful.
Tiny audits Lena's accounts occasionally, and invests her money for her; and Lena, apparently, takes care that Tiny doesn't grow too miserly.
From the look of unutterable woe upon his face, it appeared to be his doom to spend eternity in a vain effort to make his accounts balance.
By all accounts Tarshish could have been no other city than the modern Cadiz.
On more accounts than one, a pity it is that the whale does not possess this prehensile virtue in his tail; for I have heard of yet another elephant, that when wounded in the fight, curved round his trunk and extracted the dart.
And all the men of the same rank were pitted against each other; the accounts of each were kept separately, and every man lived in terror of losing his job, if another made a better record than he.
Why, I invited him; I had some accounts with him," said Shelby.
MAINLY the Round Table talk was monologues -- narrative accounts of the adventures in which these prisoners were captured and their friends and backers killed and stripped of their steeds and armor.
This accounts for the fact that in all the newspaper reports M.
But take it all around, I was feel- ing ruther comfortable on accounts of taking all this trouble for that gang, for not many would a done it.
Tom scored his accounts, and resolved to keep to the very letter of his reform, and never to put that will in jeopardy again.
It come into my mind, then, how Lem and Jim Lane had come along talking, that time, about borrowing a dog or something from Jubiter Dunlap; and that brought up the blackberries and the lantern; and that brought up Bill and Jack Withers, and how they passed by, talking about a nigger stealing Uncle Silas's corn; and that fetched up our old ghost that come along about the same time and scared us so--and here HE was too, and a privileged character, on accounts of his being deef and dumb and a stranger, and they had fixed him a chair inside the railing, where he could cross his legs and be comfortable, whilst the other people was all in a jam so they couldn't hardly breathe.