acculturation


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ac·cul·tur·a·tion

 (ə-kŭl′chə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The modification of the culture of a group or individual as a result of contact with a different culture.
2. The process by which the culture of a particular society is instilled in a human from infancy onward.

ac·cul′tur·a′tion·al adj.
ac·cul′tur·a′tive adj.

ac•cul•tur•a•tion

(əˌkʌl tʃəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process of adopting the cultural traits or social patterns of another group, esp. a dominant one.
2. a restructuring or blending of cultures resulting from this.
[1875–80, Amer.]
ac•cul`tur•a′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acculturation - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
cultivation - socialization through training and education to develop one's mind or manners; "her cultivation was remarkable"
bringing up, fosterage, fostering, nurture, rearing, upbringing, breeding, raising - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
2.acculturation - all the knowledge and values shared by a society
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
meme - a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation); "memes are the cultural counterpart of genes"
3.acculturation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structureacculturation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structure
education - the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
Translations
akulturacija

acculturation

[əˌkʌltʃəˈreɪʃən] N (frm) → aculturación f

acculturation

n (Sociol) → Akkulturation f
References in periodicals archive ?
Why and how we should study ethnic identity, acculturation, and cultural orientation.
Distribution of range, means and standard deviation of HBM constructs, sexual communication experience with family and Acculturation (n = 412) Variable n Possible Range Observed Range Perceived benefits 412 2.
Migration has become a central issue in the public discussion in Western European countries and the interest in acculturation research has strongly increased in recent years.
Even if expressed, their "problems" are mainly tied to health care concerns, parental expectations, acculturation, or discrimination, as indicated in recent research (Grossman & Liang, 2008; Juang, Syed, & Takagi, 2007; S.
His topics include images of Egypt's multicultural identity in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, Hellenizing architecture and sculpture in Meroe City, the great enclosure at Musawwarat es Sufra, and the autonomy of Nubian acculturation.
As expected, Asian males reported significant lower acculturation levels (F = 244.
Hmong Americans with 1st generation Hmong mirroring their 2nd generation counterparts in relation to reported acculturation status and depressive symptoms.
This study takes a quantitative approach to investigating the acculturation of a group of West African immigrants, specifically Nigerian adolescents and youths, living in Minnesota.
The three basic concepts that characterise the study of continuity and change include discovery or independent invention (innovation or modernisation), diffusion and acculturation.
The influence of family functioning and parent-adolescent acculturation on North American Chinese adolescent outcomes.
This article synthesises and critically reviews literature from the ethnic socialisation, biracial, acculturation and adoption fields.
Trauma and attachment in the kindertransport context; German-Jewish child refugees' account of displacement and acculturation in Britain.