acculturation


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ac·cul·tur·a·tion

 (ə-kŭl′chə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The modification of the culture of a group or individual as a result of contact with a different culture.
2. The process by which the culture of a particular society is instilled in a human from infancy onward.

ac·cul′tur·a′tion·al adj.
ac·cul′tur·a′tive adj.

ac•cul•tur•a•tion

(əˌkʌl tʃəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process of adopting the cultural traits or social patterns of another group, esp. a dominant one.
2. a restructuring or blending of cultures resulting from this.
[1875–80, Amer.]
ac•cul`tur•a′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acculturation - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
cultivation - socialization through training and education to develop one's mind or manners; "her cultivation was remarkable"
bringing up, fosterage, fostering, nurture, rearing, upbringing, breeding, raising - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
2.acculturation - all the knowledge and values shared by a society
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
meme - a cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one person to another by non-genetic means (as by imitation); "memes are the cultural counterpart of genes"
3.acculturation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structureacculturation - the process of assimilating new ideas into an existing cognitive structure
education - the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
Translations
akulturacija

acculturation

[əˌkʌltʃəˈreɪʃən] N (frm) → aculturación f

acculturation

n (Sociol) → Akkulturation f
References in periodicals archive ?
3) In other words, acculturation is what happens when you live with French people for a while and start saying "ooh la la" and eating snails.
But despite the growing use of narrative persuasion in health and social campaigns, the research literature has been largely silent about the role played by audience's acculturation in the interpretation and adoption of narrative-consistent beliefs.
But little is known about the impact of changes in behaviours, beliefs, and attitudes known as acculturation on the cardiovascular health of Chinese immigrants, who are one of the fastest growing populations in western countries.
In its most extreme and early incarnation, acculturation research has as its foundation anti-immigrant sentiments and the social Darwinist (survival of the fittest) notion that migrants are at a health disadvantage vis-a-vis White Anglo-Saxon Protestants (the dominant group) because immigrants came from defective classes whose culture is viewed as inferior.
acculturation level, SES) on career interests and subsequent career goals and choices.
Parents' decision to have their children study abroad at an early age leads to the unique experience of living in a foreign country, thereby shaping the identity of students and ultimately affecting their adult lives, especially in regard to acculturation when separated from their family (Baker, Soto, Perez, & Lee, 2012; Hwang, Wood, & Fujimoto, 2010).
This study investigated adult attachment and acculturation frameworks of reported psychosomatic complaints related to perceived discrimination among a sample of Latino/Hispanic university students (N = 160).
This study seeks to expand our understanding of students' adaptation processes and provide tangible recommendations for success given that acculturation level is directly related to students' academic development (Cheng & Fox, 2008) and their satisfaction with their educational experience (Wadsworth, Hecht, & Jung, 2008).
Results revealed that significant relationships exist among acculturation, ethnic identity, English proficiency, and attitudes toward seeking professional counseling services.
This volume summarizes research on multicultural psychology to inform mental health practices related to client race and ethnicity, focusing on client access and involvement in treatment, how client experiences are associated with the level of acculturation and the racial and ethnic background of the therapist, the influence of cultural experiences on well-being, and the effectiveness of treatment as a function of therapist multicultural competence, training in multicultural competence, and cultural adaptations and culture-specific approaches to treatment.
Risk factors of depression and anxiety in Hispanic immigrants include low socioeconomic status, linguistic barriers (Morales, Lara, Kington, Valdez, & Escarce, 2002), discrimination and acculturation (Hovey & Magana, 2002), and even gender (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001).
7) Acculturation plays a crucial role in many health behaviours, including smoking, diet and exercise.