accusative

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ac·cu·sa·tive

 (ə-kyo͞o′zə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case that is the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
2. Accusatory.
n.
1. The accusative case.
2. A word or form in the accusative case.

[Middle English acusatif, from Old French, from Latin (cāsus) accūsātīvus, (case) of accusation (mistranslation of Greek aitiātikē (ptōsis), causal (case), (case) indicating the thing caused by the verb, from aitiā, cause, also accusation, charge), from accūsātus, past participle of accūsāre, to accuse; see accuse.]

ac·cu′sa·tive·ly adv.

accusative

(əˈkjuːzətɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives in inflected languages that is used to identify the direct object of a finite verb, of certain prepositions, and for certain other purposes. See also objective5
2. (Law) another word for accusatorial
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the accusative case
b. a word or speech element in the accusative case
[C15: from Latin; in grammar, from the phrase cāsus accūsātīvus accusative case, a mistaken translation of Greek ptōsis aitiatikē the case indicating causation. See accuse]
accusatival adj
acˈcusatively adv

ac•cu•sa•tive

(əˈkyu zə tɪv)

adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case that indicates the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
n.
3. the accusative case.
4. a word or other form in the accusative case.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin accūsātīvus=ac- ac- + -cūsātīvus, comb. form of causātīvus (see causative)]
ac•cu•sa•ti•val (əˌkyu zəˈtaɪ vəl) adj.
ac•cu′sa•tive•ly, adv.

accusative

A grammatical noun case that indicates a direct object of a verb or preposition.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accusative - the case of nouns serving as the direct object of a verb
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Adj.1.accusative - containing or expressing accusationaccusative - containing or expressing accusation; "an accusitive forefinger"; "black accusatory looks"; "accusive shoes and telltale trousers"- O.Henry; "his accusing glare"
inculpative, inculpatory - causing blame to be imputed to
2.accusative - serving as or indicating the object of a verb or of certain prepositions and used for certain other purposes; "objective case"; "accusative endings"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Translations
akuzativčtvrtý pád
akuzativo
akkusatiivisyyttävä
akkuzatívusztárgyeset
ásakaþolfall
galininkas
tožilnik
ackusativ

accusative

[əˈkjuːzətɪv] (Ling)
A. ADJacusativo
B. N (also accusative case) → acusativo m
in the accusativeen acusativo

accusative

[əˈkjuːzətɪv] n (GRAMMAR)accusatif m
in the accusative → à l'accusatif

accusative

nAkkusativ m; in the accusativeim Akkusativ
adjAkkusativ-; accusative caseAkkusativ m; accusative endingAkkusativendung f

accusative

[əˈkjuːztɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → accusativo/a
2. n (Gram) → accusativo
in the accusative → all'accusativo
References in classic literature ?
However, this rain is not resting, but is doing something ACTIVELY,--it is falling--to interfere with the bird, likely--and this indicates MOVEMENT, which has the effect of sliding it into the Accusative case and changing DEM Regen into DEN Regen.
Well, he--," said the two, indicating their opponent with accusative forefingers.
7) Accusatives of extent and accusatives of goal are not objects, but adjuncts; the expression of goal and extent can be treated as semantic rather than syntactic uses of the accusative.
These are nominatives; the accusatives are laeswe and sinwe.
2) The forms in question include the Romanian accusatives mine, tine and sine, the stressed counterparts to the clitic m(a), te and s(e); LogudoreseNuorese Sardinian mene and tene, which in some variants of the dialect coexist with the shorter me and te; Veglia Dalmatian main and the predictable but unattested *tain and *sain, the stressed counterparts, respectively, of me, te and se; and central and southern Italian mene, tene and sene, in their local garb, used alongside the unstressed me, te and se in Tuscany, Umbria, Lazio, the Marche, Abruzzo, Naples, Calabria, Sicily and Salento (Bartoli, Das Dalmatische, vol.
tua, especially if the accusatives were written compendiously with supralineal abbreviations for the m's.
Terescenko adds that in westward dialects of Tundra Nenets the overlapping of singular nominatives and accusatives in consonant-stemmed direct objects is entirely common.
F's traditum may have been the result of an abbreviation, of which there were several in this sentence with its many accusatives (thus GCA 1995, 37 ad loc.
Cognate accusatives: Cognate accusatives (for example, "I dreamed a dream," "I did a deed") are fairly common and a hallmark of literary style in Biblical Hebrew.
But while larger program junior faculty may be more readily able to integrate their research agendas into their advanced undergraduate and graduate courses, small program faculty will evidently be preparing exercises on Latin accusatives, observing multiple Italian language sections, juggling seminars on Neorealism or Sacco and Vanzetti, standing in lines with groups of undergraduates during the summer months to see the Sistine Chapel, contributing lectures on the morphological discrepancies between various Osco-Umbrian dialects, and/or self-teaching ourselves other subjects or tasks on the fly, any or all of which may very well keep us from pondering the finer points of the possible psychoanalytic explanations for the Matilda figure in Purgatory 28, for instance.
The accusatives lack agreement: me is, you is, him is, us is, youse is, them is (Henry 1995: 32-42).