acorn

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a·corn

 (ā′kôrn′, ā′kərn)
n.
The fruit of an oak, consisting of a single-seeded, thick-walled nut set in a woody, cuplike base.

[Middle English akorn, from Old English æcern.]
Word History: A thoughtful glance at the word acorn might produce the surmise that it is made up of oak (from Old English āc) and corn, especially if we think of corn in its sense of "a kernel or seed of a plant," as in peppercorn. The fact that others thought the word was so constituted partly accounts for the present form acorn. Here we see the workings of the process of linguistic change known as folk etymology, an alteration in form of a word or phrase so that it resembles a more familiar term mistakenly regarded as analogous. Acorn actually goes back to Old English æcern, "acorn," which in turn goes back to the Indo-European root *ōg-, meaning "fruit, berry."

acorn

(ˈeɪkɔːn)
n
(Botany) the fruit of an oak tree, consisting of a smooth thick-walled nut in a woody scaly cuplike base
[C16: a variant (through influence of corn) of Old English æcern the fruit of a tree, acorn; related to Gothic akran fruit, yield]

a•corn

(ˈeɪ kɔrn, ˈeɪ kərn)

n.
the typically ovoid fruit or nut of an oak, enclosed at the base by a cupule.
[before 1000; Middle English acorne (influenced by corn1), akern, Old English æcern, æcren mast, c. Middle High German ackeran acorn, Old Norse akarn fruit of wild trees, Gothic akran fruit, yield]
a′corned, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acorn - fruit of the oak tree: a smooth thin-walled nut in a woody cup-shaped baseacorn - fruit of the oak tree: a smooth thin-walled nut in a woody cup-shaped base
acorn cup, cupule - cup-shaped structure of hardened bracts at the base of an acorn
oak tree, oak - a deciduous tree of the genus Quercus; has acorns and lobed leaves; "great oaks grow from little acorns"
fruit - the ripened reproductive body of a seed plant
Translations
žalud
agern
tammenterhoterho
žir
makk
akarn
どんぐり
도토리
ekollon
ผลต้นโอ๊ก
quả sồi

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːn] Nbellota f

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːrn] ngland m

acorn

nEichel f

acorn

[ˈeɪkɔːn] n (Bot) → ghianda

acorn

جَوْزَةُ البَلُّوط žalud agern Eichel βελανίδι bellota terho gland žir ghianda どんぐり 도토리 eikel eikenøtt żołądź bolota желудь ekollon ผลต้นโอ๊ก meşe palamudu quả sồi 橡果
References in classic literature ?
There was a pleasing inequality in the table, which produced many mishaps to cups and plates, acorns dropped in the milk, little black ants partook of the refreshments without being invited, and fuzzy caterpillars swung down from the tree to see what was going on.
Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
He laid into his work like a nigger, and the way he hove acorns into that hole for about two hours and a half was one of the most exciting and astonishing spectacles I ever struck.
said the swine-herd, after blowing his horn obstreperously, to collect together the scattered herd of swine, which, answering his call with notes equally melodious, made, however, no haste to remove themselves from the luxurious banquet of beech-mast and acorns on which they had fattened, or to forsake the marshy banks of the rivulet, where several of them, half plunged in mud, lay stretched at their ease, altogether regardless of the voice of their keeper.
The method is this: in an acre of ground you bury, at six inches distance and eight deep, a quantity of acorns, dates, chestnuts, and other mast or vegetables, whereof these animals are fondest; then you drive six hundred or more of them into the field, where, in a few days, they will root up the whole ground in search of their food, and make it fit for sowing, at the same time manuring it with their dung: it is true, upon experiment, they found the charge and trouble very great, and they had little or no crop.
The course of meat finished, they spread upon the sheepskins a great heap of parched acorns, and with them they put down a half cheese harder than if it had been made of mortar.
Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them some acorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried back to tell me about the sad fate of our comrades.
cried the enchantress, giving them some smart strokes with her wand; and then she turned to the serving men--"Drive out these swine, and throw down some acorns for them to eat.
She saw him once again at Rome, on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, carrying a burden of acorns.
Ay, marry," grumbled the other, "but 'a did not think to have a hard-footed knave trample all over my poor toes as though they were no more than so many acorns in the forest.
I saw her first, gathering young acorns from the branches of a large oak near our tree.
She said acorns would produce mistletoe, from which an irremediable poison, the bird- lime, would be extracted and by which they would be captured.