acquitted


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ac·quit

 (ə-kwĭt′)
tr.v. ac·quit·ted, ac·quit·ting, ac·quits
1. Law To find not guilty of a criminal offense.
2. To conduct (oneself) in a specified manner: acquitted herself well during the interview.
3. Archaic To release or discharge from an obligation, such as a debt.
4. Obsolete To repay.

[Middle English aquiten, from Old French aquiter : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + quite, free, clear (from Medieval Latin quittus, variant of Latin quiētus, past participle of quiēscere, to rest; see kweiə- in Indo-European roots).]

ac·quit′ter n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.acquitted - declared not guilty of a specific offense or crimeacquitted - declared not guilty of a specific offense or crime; legally blameless; "he stands acquitted on all charges"; "the jury found him not guilty by reason of insanity"
clean-handed, guiltless, innocent - free from evil or guilt; "an innocent child"; "the principle that one is innocent until proved guilty"
References in classic literature ?
During the remainder of the day, poor Hepzibah acquitted herself even less creditably, as a shop-keeper, than in her earlier efforts.
At that hour most of the others were sewing likewise; but one class still stood round Miss Scatcherd's chair reading, and as all was quiet, the subject of their lessons could be heard, together with the manner in which each girl acquitted herself, and the animadversions or commendations of Miss Scatcherd on the performance.
The friends of the acquitted prisoner had dispersed, under the impression--which he himself had originated--that he would not be released that night.
A score or so of years ago, that woman was tried at the Old Bailey for murder, and was acquitted.
Jane, the first to follow her, was anxious as to the strength of the ice; but when reassured, she acquitted herself admirably, for she was proficient in outdoor exercises, and had the satisfaction of laughing in the field at those who laughed at her in the study.
Neither had I so soon learned the gratitude of courtiers, to persuade myself, that his majesty's present seventies acquitted me of all past obligations.
It certainly agrees in tone and character with the description of Xenophon, who says in the Memorabilia that Socrates might have been acquitted 'if in any moderate degree he would have conciliated the favour of the dicasts;' and who informs us in another passage, on the testimony of Hermogenes, the friend of Socrates, that he had no wish to live; and that the divine sign refused to allow him to prepare a defence, and also that Socrates himself declared this to be unnecessary, on the ground that all his life long he had been preparing against that hour.
He acquitted his task with characteristic serenity, and invariably replied to the remonstrances of his fair companion, who was confused by his patience and generosity:
This caused so rapid and complete a diversion from the attack that D'Artagnan's adversary, while the latter turned round to face this shower of blows, sheathed his sword with the same precision, and instead of an actor, which he had nearly been, became a spectator of the fight--a part in which he acquitted himself with his usual impassiveness, muttering, nevertheless, "A plague upon these Gascons
Having acquitted themselves of their errand, and exchanged a hearty shake of the hand with Edmond, Danglars and Caderousse took their places beside Fernand and old Dantes, -- the latter of whom attracted universal notice.
The Indian children used them in hunting the small game of the neighborhood, such as rabbits and prairie dogs; in which mongrel kind of chase they acquitted themselves with some credit.
All he said was said in his throat and nose, for it is thus the Flamands speak, but I heard him to the end of his paragraph without proffering a word of correction, whereat he looked vastly self-complacent, convinced, no doubt, that he had acquitted himself like a real born and bred "Anglais.