acrid


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ac·rid

 (ăk′rĭd)
adj.
1. Unpleasantly sharp, pungent, or bitter to the taste or smell. See Synonyms at bitter.
2. Caustic in language or tone: an acrid political campaign.

[From Latin ācer, sharp (probably modeled on acid); see ak- in Indo-European roots.]

a·crid′i·ty (ə-krĭd′ĭ-tē), ac′rid·ness n.
ac′rid·ly adv.

acrid

(ˈækrɪd)
adj
1. unpleasantly pungent or sharp to the smell or taste
2. sharp or caustic, esp in speech or nature
[C18: from Latin ācer sharp, sour; probably formed on the model of acid]
acridity, ˈacridness n
ˈacridly adv

ac•rid

(ˈæk rɪd)

adj.
1. harshly or bitterly pungent in taste or smell; irritating to the eyes, nose, etc.
2. sharply stinging or bitter; caustic: acrid remarks.
[1705–15; < Latin ācr- (s. of ācer) sharp, sour]
a•crid•i•ty (əˈkrɪd ɪ ti) ac′rid•ness, n.
ac′rid•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.acrid - strong and sharp;"the pungent taste of radishes"; "the acrid smell of burning rubber"
tasty - pleasing to the sense of taste; "a tasty morsel"
2.acrid - harsh or corrosive in toneacrid - harsh or corrosive in tone; "an acerbic tone piercing otherwise flowery prose"; "a barrage of acid comments"; "her acrid remarks make her many enemies"; "bitter words"; "blistering criticism"; "caustic jokes about political assassination, talk-show hosts and medical ethics"; "a sulfurous denunciation"; "a vitriolic critique"
unpleasant - disagreeable to the senses, to the mind, or feelings ; "an unpleasant personality"; "unpleasant repercussions"; "unpleasant odors"

acrid

adjective
1. pungent, biting, strong, burning, sharp, acid, bitter, harsh, stinging, irritating, caustic, astringent, vitriolic, highly flavoured, acerb The room filled with the acrid smell of tobacco.
2. harsh, cutting, biting, sharp, bitter, nasty, acrimonious, caustic, vitriolic, trenchant, mordant, mordacious He is soured by acrid memories he has dredged up.

acrid

adjective
1. Having a noticeably sharp pungent taste or smell:
Translations
حَرِّيف، حَاد
štiplavý
krasskarp
rammur, svíîandi
aitrus
kodīgssīvs

acrid

[ˈækrɪd] ADJ
1. (lit) [smell, taste] → acre, punzante
2. (fig) → áspero, mordaz

acrid

[ˈækrɪd] adj [smell, taste] → âcre; [smoke, fumes] → âcre

acrid

adj tastebitter; (of wine)sauer; smellsäuerlich; comment, smokebeißend

acrid

[ˈækrɪd] adj (smell) → acre, pungente (fig) → pungente

acrid

(ˈӕkrid) adjective
harsh in smell or taste. The acrid smell of smoke filled the room.

ac·rid

a. amargo-a, agrio-a, acre, irritante.
References in classic literature ?
The place was damp, the air acrid with the smell of stale tobacco juice, and foul with the presence of many unwashed humans.
While the latter expression was yet on his lips, he caught a glimpse of Hepzibah, who had involuntarily bent forward to the window; and then the smile changed from acrid and disagreeable to the sunniest complacency and benevolence.
She possessed affections, too, though hitherto acrid and disagreeable, as are the richest flavours of unripe fruit.
Georgiana, who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged.
In Numa's estimation man was a slow-witted, slow-footed creature which commanded no respect unless accompanied by the acrid odor which spelled to the monarch's sensitive nostrils the great noise and the blinding flash of an express rifle.
The decanter of sherry was on the table half full, but there was a queer, acrid smell about.
sour, acrid, salt, sweet, bitter), yet combinations of them yield more flavors than can ever be tasted.
The salt, acrid flavour is gone out of the air, together with a sense of unlimited space opening free beyond the threshold of sandbanks below the Nore.
Women who are never bitter and resentful are often the most querulous; and if Solomon was as wise as he is reputed to be, I feel sure that when he compared a contentious woman to a continual dropping on a very rainy day, he had not a vixen in his eye--a fury with long nails, acrid and selfish.
Moreover, though he was neither like Crimsworth nor Lord Tynedale, yet he was acrid, and, I suspected, overbearing in his way: there was a tone of despotism in the urgency of the very reproaches by which, he aimed at goading the oppressed into rebellion against the oppressor.
Days passed -- it might have been that many days passed -- ere it swept so closely over me as to fan me with its acrid breath.
But the dullness of his days pleased him; his melancholy, which was settling into a secondary stage, like a healing wound, had in it a certain acrid, palatable sweetness.