acrophobia


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ac·ro·pho·bi·a

 (ăk′rə-fō′bē-ə)
n.
An abnormal fear of high places.

ac′ro·phobe′ n.
ac′ro·pho′bic (-fō′bĭk) adj. & n.

acrophobia

(ˌækrəˈfəʊbɪə)
n
(Psychiatry) abnormal fear or dread of being at a great height
[C19: from acro- + -phobia]
ˌacroˈphobic adj, n

ac•ro•pho•bi•a

(ˌæk rəˈfoʊ bi ə)

n.
a pathological fear of heights.
[1890–95; < New Latin]
ac′ro•phobe`, n.
ac`ro•pho′bic, adj., n.

acrophobia

an abnormal fear of being at great heights Also called altophobia, batophobia, hypsiphobia.
See also: Heights
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acrophobia - a morbid fear of great heightsacrophobia - a morbid fear of great heights  
simple phobia - any phobia (other than agoraphobia) associated with relatively simple well-defined stimuli
Translations
akrofóbia

ac·ro·pho·bi·a

n. acrofobia, mal de altura; temor excesivo a la altitud.

acrophobia

n acrofobia
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: If you've got acrophobia, paranoia, fear of flying, PTSD, even depression, software could soon be the solution
This video will give you the creeps, and if you suffer from acrophobia, move your eyes away.
He agrees, but his severe acrophobia and the shocking twists and turns of the case take their toll (1958) ***
A lift inside one of the trees takes visitors 160 feet up to an elevated walkway for a panoramic view, which is enough to test anyone (like me) with acrophobia.
A lift inside one of the trees takes visitors 160ft up to an elevated walkway for a panoramic view, which is enough to test anyone - like me - with acrophobia.
But what do acrid, acme and acrophobia have in common?
He tells his dream to "Uncle Nathan the Prophet" (a name whose signification, based on the image of Nathan in II Samuel 12 and I Kings 3, cannot be dismissed) about being arrested as a symbol of self-imprisonment and confesses to acrophobia as a sign of his fear of death.
You may not think you have acrophobia now but after reading this section you may be forced to reconsider.
Rebel, who studied at the Australian Theatre for Young People, before moving to New York in 2003, explains that she had to conquer her acrophobia to pull off the flamboyantly grand entrance, which sees her suspended from the theatre ceiling on circus ribbons.
Wilson, who studied at the Australian Theatre for Young People, before moving to New York in 2003, explains that she had to conquer her acrophobia to pull off the flamboyantly grand entrance, which sees her suspended from the theatre ceiling on circus ribbons.
Subject entries include acrophobia, age of onset, cognitive bias modification, comorbidity, three pathways theory, and a wide variety of other related topics.
The book gives the reader a mystery to solve while providing useful information about acrophobia.