actress


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ac·tress

 (ăk′trĭs)
n.
A woman who is an actor. See Usage Note at -ess.

actress

(ˈæktrɪs)
n
1. (Theatre) a woman who acts in a play, film, broadcast, etc
2. informal a woman who puts on a false manner in order to deceive others

ac•tress

(ˈæk trɪs)

n.
a woman who acts in stage plays, motion pictures, etc., esp. professionally.
[1580–90]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.actress - a female actoractress - a female actor      
actor, histrion, thespian, role player, player - a theatrical performer
leading lady - actress who plays the leading female role
starlet - a young (film) actress who is publicized as a future star
tragedienne - an actress who specializes in tragic roles

actress

noun
A theatrical performer:
Translations
актриса
herečka
skuespiller
näitlejannanäitlejatar
näyttelijätär
glumica
színésznő
leikkona
女優
여자 배우
actrix
actriţă
herečka
igralka
skådespelerska
นักแสดงหญิง
nữ diễn viên

actress

[ˈæktrɪs] Nactriz f

actress

[ˈæktrəs] nactrice f
She is an actress → Elle est actrice.
She is a well-known actress → Elle est une actrice connue.

actress

n (lit, fig)Schauspielerin f

actress

[ˈæktrɪs] nattrice f

actress

مـُمَثِّلَة herečka skuespiller Schauspielerin ηθοποιός actriz näyttelijätär actrice glumica attrice 女優 여자 배우 actrice skuespillerinne aktorka atriz актриса skådespelerska นักแสดงหญิง kadın oyuncu nữ diễn viên 女演员
References in classic literature ?
Toward the end of April, the billboards, which I watched anxiously in those days, bloomed out one morning with gleaming white posters on which two names were impressively printed in blue Gothic letters: the name of an actress of whom I had often heard, and the name `Camille.
In this dress the deceased actress received such honour as actress never received before, nor has ever received since.
You seem to be a little feverish tonight," said the actress.
If airs and graces make an actress, ma'am, Magdalen's performance will astonish us all.
Nicholas had the honour of playing in a slight piece with Miss Petowker that night, and could not but observe that the warmth of her reception was mainly attributable to a most persevering umbrella in the upper boxes; he saw, too, that the enchanting actress cast many sweet looks towards the quarter whence these sounds proceeded; and that every time she did so, the umbrella broke out afresh.
One evening, tired with his experimenting, and not being able to elicit the facts he needed, he left his frogs and rabbits to some repose under their trying and mysterious dispensation of unexplained shocks, and went to finish his evening at the theatre of the Porte Saint Martin, where there was a melodrama which he had already seen several times; attracted, not by the ingenious work of the collaborating authors, but by an actress whose part it was to stab her lover, mistaking him for the evil-designing duke of the piece.
At first, a poor youth battling with adversity; then the lover of an actress, whom he followed through the provinces, play-writing for the strolling troupe to which she was attached; the next, secretary to a high personage engaged in a mission to Thibet; then soldier, and finally poet of renown, acquiring with his latter years the fortune and honours denied him in his youth.
And hence, I think, we may very fairly draw an argument, to prove how extremely natural virtue is to the fair sex; for, though there is not, perhaps, one in ten thousand who is capable of making a good actress, and even among these we rarely see two who are equally able to personate the same character, yet this of virtue they can all admirably well put on; and as well those individuals who have it not, as those who possess it, can all act it to the utmost degree of perfection.
He mentioned a French actress, and was going to tell something about her; but the ambassador's wife, with playful horror, cut him short.
There was the great French actress who had every charm but youth, chatting vivaciously with a tall, pale-faced man whose French seemed to be as perfect as his attitude was correct.
Simplicity, indeed, is beyond the reach of almost every actress by profession.
Neither was what was commonly called the stage door; they were a sort of special and private stage doors used by very special performers, and in this case by the star actor and actress in the Shakespearean performance of the day.