adder


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Related to adder: puff adder, Full adder

add·er 1

 (ăd′ər)
n.
One that adds, especially a computational device that performs arithmetic addition.

ad·der 2

 (ăd′ər)
n.
1. Any of several venomous snakes, especially a viper of the subfamily Viperinae.
2. Any of several nonvenomous snakes, such as the hognose snake, often believed to be harmful.

[Middle English, from an addre, alteration of a naddre, a snake, from Old English nǣdre, snake.]

adder

(ˈædə)
n
1. (Animals) Also called: viper a common viper, Vipera berus, that is widely distributed in Europe, including Britain, and Asia and is typically dark greyish in colour with a black zigzag pattern along the back
2. (Animals) any of various similar venomous or nonvenomous snakes
[Old English nǣdre snake; in Middle English a naddre was mistaken for an addre; related to Old Norse nathr, Gothic nadrs]

adder

(ˈædə)
n
(Computer Science) a person or thing that adds, esp a single element of an electronic computer, the function of which is to add a single digit of each of two inputs

ad•der1

(ˈæd ər)

n.
1. the common European viper, Vipera berus.
2. any of various snakes resembling the viper.
[before 950; late Middle English; replacing Middle English nadder (a nadder becoming an adder by misdivision), Old English næddre]

add•er2

(ˈæd ər)

n.
a person or thing that adds.
[1570–80]

adder

- A snake, it was first "a nadder," which was misanalyzed to "an adder."
See also related terms for snake.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adder - a person who adds numbersadder - a person who adds numbers    
calculator, estimator, figurer, reckoner, computer - an expert at calculation (or at operating calculating machines)
2.adder - a machine that adds numbersadder - a machine that adds numbers    
calculating machine, calculator - a small machine that is used for mathematical calculations
3.adder - small terrestrial viper common in northern Eurasiaadder - small terrestrial viper common in northern Eurasia
viper - venomous Old World snakes characterized by hollow venom-conducting fangs in the upper jaw
genus Vipera, Vipera - type genus of the Viperidae
Translations

adder

[ˈædəʳ] Nvíbora f

adder

[ˈædər] n (= snake) → vipère f

adder

nViper f, → Natter f

adder

[ˈædəʳ] nvipera
References in classic literature ?
Well, by and by an adder bit a knight's heel; the knight forgot all about the order, and made a slash at the adder with his sword.
cried Athos, with an accent like that of a man who perceives he is about to tread upon an adder.
Porthos sucked his mustache, muttering, "A good deal of ceremony to-night about crushing an adder.
But it was too late to recede, so we moved on slowly, my companion in advance casting eager glances under the trees on each side, until all at once I saw him recoil as if stung by an adder.
Some humour, or some fever in my blood, At other seasons temperate, or some thought That like an adder creeps from point to point, That like a madman crawls from cell to cell, Poisons my palate and makes appetite A loathing, not a longing.
Hawk-eye,” said the Indian, tottering with a doubtful step from his place, “I am the Great Snake of the Delawares; I can track the Mingoes like an adder that is stealing on the whip-poor-will’s eggs, and strike them like the rattlesnake dead at a blow.
Observing a married couple, whose domestic troubles were matter of notoriety, he condoled with both on having mutually taken a house adder to their bosoms.
I woke again in the dark with a sensation that could not be put in colder or more literal words than that a breath bit like an adder.
the squirrel can guard himself against the adder with very little trouble.
As for the friar, had he known who Robin Hood was, you may well believe he would almost as soon have slept with an adder as with the man he had for a bedfellow.
To all entreaties, protestations, and offers of compromise between his own proposals and those which Arthur Gride had first suggested, Ralph was deaf as an adder.
But natural selection can and does often produce structures for the direct injury of other species, as we see in the fang of the adder, and in the ovipositor of the ichneumon, by which its eggs are deposited in the living bodies of other insects.