addressing


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ad·dress

 (ə-drĕs′)
tr.v. ad·dressed, ad·dress·ing, ad·dress·es
1. To speak to: addressed me in low tones.
2. To make a formal speech to: addressed the union members at the convention.
3. To call (a person to whom one is speaking) by a particular name or term: Address the judge as "Your Honor."
4. To direct (a spoken or written message) to the attention of: address a protest to the faculty senate.
5. To mark with a destination: address a letter.
6.
a. To direct the efforts or attention of (oneself): address oneself to a task.
b. To begin to deal with: addressed the issue of taxes.
7. To dispatch or consign (a ship, for example) to an agent or factor.
8. Sports To adjust and aim the club at (a golf ball) in preparing for a stroke.
n. (ə-drĕs′, ăd′rĕs′)
1.
a. A description of the location of a person or organization, as written or printed on mail as directions for delivery: wrote the address on the envelope.
b. The location at which a particular organization or person may be found or reached: went to her address but no one was home.
2.
a. A name or a sequence of characters that designates an email account or a specific site on the internet or other network.
b. A name or number used in information storage or retrieval assigned to or identifying a specific memory location.
3. A formal speech or written communication.
4. (ə-drĕs′) Archaic
a. often addresses Courteous attentions.
b. The manner or bearing of a person, especially in conversation.
c. Skill, deftness, or grace in dealing with people or situations: "With the charms of beauty she combined the address of an accomplished intriguer" (Charles Merivale).

[Middle English adressen, to direct, from Old French adresser, from Vulgar Latin *addīrēctiāre : Latin ad-, ad- + Vulgar Latin *dīrēctiāre, to straighten (from Latin dīrēctus, past participle of dīrigere, to direct; see direct).]

addressing

(əˈdresɪŋ)
n
(Computer Science) a method by which a computer network can identify which device sent a piece of information over the network, and which device received it
Translations

addressing

[əˈdresɪŋ]
A. N (Comput) → direccionamiento m
B. CPD addressing machine Nmáquina f de direcciones
References in classic literature ?
interrupted Jo, addressing the fire in her turn, and watching with delight the happy light it seemed to kindle in the eyes that had been so tragically gloomy when she saw them last.
Meanwhile Robert, addressing Mrs Pontellier, continued to tell of his one time hopeless passion for Madame Ratignolle; of sleepless nights, of consuming flames till the very sea sizzled when he took his daily plunge.
said the white man, shaking his head while he spoke, and addressing the father.
That's what I allus said," continued Dick, addressing space generally; "if there's any one ez knows how to come square down to the bottom rock without flinchin', it's your high-toned, fash'nable gals.
It is a little remarkable, that -- though disinclined to talk overmuch of myself and my affairs at the fireside, and to my personal friends -- an autobiographical impulse should twice in my life have taken possession of me, in addressing the public.
Though they were not angels, they "passed," as the French say, causing me, while they stayed, to tremble with the fear of their addressing to their younger victims some yet more infernal message or more vivid image than they had thought good enough for myself.
It was a shocking bad wound, began the whale-surgeon; and, taking my advice, Captain Boomer here, stood our old Sammy-- Samuel Enderby is the name of my ship, interrupted the one-armed captain, addressing Ahab; go on, boy.
Jim, see to the trunks," said the gentleman, negligently; then addressing himself to Mr.
Weston to himnot in the least suspecting that she was addressing a lover.
This was all overheard by Miss Dashwood; and in the whole of the sentence, in his manner of pronouncing it, and in his addressing her sister by her christian name alone, she instantly saw an intimacy so decided, a meaning so direct, as marked a perfect agreement between them.
Bessie answered not; but ere long, addressing me, she said--"You ought to be aware, Miss, that you are under obligations to Mrs.
YOU bid him step up,' he said, addressing me; 'and, Catherine, try to be glad, without being absurd.