adjacent


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ad·ja·cent

 (ə-jā′sənt)
adj.
1. Close to; lying near: adjacent cities.
2. Next to; adjoining: adjacent garden plots.

[Middle English, from Latin adiacēns, adiacent-, present participle of adiacēre, to lie near : ad-, ad- + iacēre, to lie; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

ad·ja′cent·ly adv.

adjacent

(əˈdʒeɪsənt)
adj
1. being near or close, esp having a common boundary; adjoining; contiguous
2. (Mathematics) maths
a. (of a pair of vertices in a graph) joined by a common edge
b. (of a pair of edges in a graph) meeting at a common vertex
n
(Mathematics) geometry the side lying between a specified angle and a right angle in a right-angled triangle
[C15: from Latin adjacēre to lie next to, from ad- near + jacēre to lie]
adˈjacency n
adˈjacently adv

ad•ja•cent

(əˈdʒeɪ sənt)

adj.
1. lying near, close, or contiguous; adjoining.
2. just before, after, or facing: an adjacent page.
[1400–50; < Latin adjacent-, s. of adjacēns, present participle of adjacēre to adjoin =ad- ad- + jacēre to lie]
ad•ja′cent•ly, adv.
syn: See adjoining.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.adjacent - nearest in space or positionadjacent - nearest in space or position; immediately adjoining without intervening space; "had adjacent rooms"; "in the next room"; "the person sitting next to me"; "our rooms were side by side"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"
2.adjacent - having a common boundary or edge; abutting; touching; "Rhode Island has two bordering states; Massachusetts and Conncecticut"; "the side of Germany conterminous with France"; "Utah and the contiguous state of Idaho"; "neighboring cities"
connected - joined or linked together
3.adjacent - near or close to but not necessarily touchingadjacent - near or close to but not necessarily touching; "lands adjacent to the mountains"; "New York and adjacent cities"
near, nigh, close - not far distant in time or space or degree or circumstances; "near neighbors"; "in the near future"; "they are near equals"; "his nearest approach to success"; "a very near thing"; "a near hit by the bomb"; "she was near tears"; "she was close to tears"; "had a close call"

adjacent

adjective
1. adjoining, neighbouring, nearby, abutting The fire quickly spread to adjacent shops.
adjoining separated, remote, distant, far away
preposition
1. (with to) next to, touching, close to, neighbouring, beside, near to, adjoining, bordering on, next door to, abutting, cheek by jowl with, alongside of, contiguous to, within sniffing distance of (informal), proximate to offices adjacent to the museum

adjacent

adjective
1. Not far from another in space, time, or relation:
2. Sharing a common boundary:
Translations
مُجاوِرمُجَاوِر، مُتَاخِم، قَرِيب مِن
přilehlýsousední
tilstødende
viereinen
susjedan
szomszédos
aîliggjandi
近接した
인접한
gretimas
blakus
aangrenzendaanpalender naast liggendtegenoverstaand
susedný
närliggande
ติดกัน
liền kề

adjacent

[əˈdʒeɪsənt] ADJcontiguo; [angle] → adyacente
adjacent tocontiguo a

adjacent

[əˈdʒeɪsənt] adj [room, building] → adjacent(e), contigu/guë
adjacent to → adjacent(e) à

adjacent

adjangrenzend; to be adjacent to somethingan etw (acc)angrenzen, neben etw (dat)liegen; the adjacent roomdas Nebenzimmer, das Zimmer nebenan

adjacent

[əˈdʒeɪsnt] adj adjacent (to)adiacente (a)

adjacent

(əˈdʒeisənt) adjective
(often with to) lying next (to). We had adjacent rooms in the hotel; They have bought the house adjacent to mine.

adjacent

مُجاوِر přilehlý tilstødende angrenzend διπλανός adyacente viereinen adjacent susjedan adiacente 近接した 인접한 aangrenzend tilstøtende sąsiadujący adjacente смежный närliggande ติดกัน bitişik liền kề 邻近的

adjacent

a. adyacente, contiguo, al lado de.
References in classic literature ?
Perhaps no district throughout the wide extent of the intermediate frontiers can furnish a livelier picture of the cruelty and fierceness of the savage warfare of those periods than the country which lies between the head waters of the Hudson and the adjacent lakes.
There was the flash of a red shirt vanishing in an adjacent doorway; the fading apparition of a pair of high boots and blue overalls in another; the abrupt withdrawal of a curly blond head from a sashless window over the way.
In the growth of the town, however, after some thirty or forty years, the site covered by this rude hovel had become exceedingly desirable in the eyes of a prominent and powerful personage, who asserted plausible claims to the proprietorship of this and a large adjacent tract of land, on the strength of a grant from the legislature.
Before Roger Chillingworth could answer, they heard the clear, wild laughter of a young child's voice, proceeding from the adjacent burial-ground.
This name was given, we are told, in former days, by the good housewives of the adjacent country, from the inveterate propensity of their husbands to linger about the village tavern on market days.
However, hat and coat and overshoes were one by one removed, and hung up in a little space in an adjacent corner; when, arrayed in a decent suit, he quietly approached the pulpit.
Bear in mind, too, that under these untoward circumstances he has to cut many feet deep in the flesh; and in that subterraneous manner, without so much as getting one single peep into the ever-contracting gash thus made, he must skilfully steer clear of all adjacent, interdicted parts, and exactly divide the spine at a critical point hard by its insertion into the skull.
I was an involuntary spectator and auditor of whatever was done and said in the kitchen of the adjacent village inn--a wholly new and rare experience to me.
It is a fine sight to see the evening sunlight suddenly strike the leafy declivity at the Castle's base and dash up it and drench it as with a luminous spray, while the adjacent groves are in deep shadow.
It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.
As we drew a little nearer, and saw the whole adjacent prospect lying a straight low line under the sky, I hinted to Peggotty that a mound or so might have improved it; and also that if the land had been a little more separated from the sea, and the town and the tide had not been quite so much mixed up, like toast and water, it would have been nicer.
Not stumbling on the means after all, I was fain to go out to the adjacent Lodge and get the watchman there to come with his lantern.