adjudicator


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ad·ju·di·cate

 (ə-jo͞o′dĭ-kāt′)
v. ad·ju·di·cat·ed, ad·ju·di·cat·ing, ad·ju·di·cates
v.tr.
1. To make a decision (in a legal case or proceeding), as where a judge or arbitrator rules on some disputed issue or claim between the parties.
2. To study and settle (a dispute or conflict): The principal adjudicated the students' quarrel.
3. To act as a judge of (a contest or an aspect of a contest).
v.intr.
1. To make a decision in a legal case or proceeding: a judge adjudicating on land claims.
2. To study and settle a dispute or conflict.
3. To act as a judge of a contest.

[Latin adiūdicāre, adiūdicāt-, to award to (judicially) : ad-, ad- + iūdicāre, to judge (from iūdex, judge; see judge).]

ad·ju′di·ca′tion n.
ad·ju′di·ca′tive adj.
ad·ju′di·ca′tor n.

adjudicator

(əˈdʒuːdɪˌkeɪtə)
n
1. a judge, esp in a competition
2. an arbitrator, esp in a dispute
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adjudicator - a person who studies and settles conflicts and disputesadjudicator - a person who studies and settles conflicts and disputes
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
judge, jurist, justice - a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justice
official - someone who administers the rules of a game or sport; "the golfer asked for an official who could give him a ruling"

adjudicator

noun judge, referee, umpire, arbiter, arbitrator, moderator an independent adjudicator
Translations
rozhodčísoudce
bedømmerdommer
zsûritag
dómari

adjudicator

[əˈdʒuːdɪkeɪtəʳ] Njuez mf, árbitro mf

adjudicator

[əˈdʒuːdɪkeɪtər] njuge mf

adjudicator

n (in competition etc) → Preisrichter(in) m(f); (in dispute) → Schiedsrichter(in) m(f)

adjudicator

[əˈdʒuːdɪˌkeɪtəʳ] n (of dispute, competition) → arbitro

adjudicate

(əˈdʒuːdikeit) verb
to act as a judge (in an artistic competition etc).
aˌdjudiˈcation noun
aˈdjudicator noun
References in periodicals archive ?
In early 2012, the inaugural class of consular adjudicators received assignments to Beijing, Guangzhou and Shanghai, as well as posts in Brazil, namely, Brasilia, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.
Christine Tacon, the Groceries Code Adjudicator, released the findings at the second annual conference of the organisation, which was set up to oversee the relationship between supermarkets and their suppliers.
The survey also showed that 54% of those who raised issues with the adjudicator in the last year concerned Tesco, compared with 26% about Morrisons, 15% about Asda, 14% about the Co-op, 13% about Sainsbury's, 5% about Iceland, 1% about Marks & Spencer, Waitrose and Lidl, while none concerned Aldi.
The Adjudicator will be able to impose penalties on the large supermarkets of up to 1% of their annual UK turnover if they breach the Groceries Code.
The Minister said: "My position on this important matter has consistently been that we need an Adjudicator with real power.
The adjudicator will be able to impose penalties on the large supermarkets of up to 1% of their annual UK turnover, dependant on the seriousness of the breach, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills announced.
Survivors who would prefer to have the transcripts of their testimony to the IAP returned to them can request a copy by asking the adjudicator at their hearing, contacting the Chief Adjudicator's Office directly at 306-790-4700 or asking their lawyer to contact the Chief Adjudicator's Office on their behalf.
The terms of reference of the inquiry provided that the allegations the adjudicator was to inquire into were whether: (i) Mr.
He said: "My view has always been that the bus lane signs are legal and that has been confirmed by the adjudicator.
NEC does not envisage this role for the adjudicator.
We urge the Minister to come forward and announce whether or not the Government will stick to their pledge to introduce a code and adjudicator.
Under proposals announced by Business Secretary Vince Cable, the adjudicator will enforce a new statutory code to oversee the relationship between publicans and large pub companies.