admonish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

ad·mon·ish

 (ăd-mŏn′ĭsh)
tr.v. ad·mon·ished, ad·mon·ish·ing, ad·mon·ish·es
1.
a. To counsel (another) against something to be avoided or warn (that something is dangerous): "[Another competitor in the race] admonished him on the dangers of going out too fast" (Neal Bascomb)."Magazine articles ... admonished that women's financial independence was driving a wedge between husband and wife" (Lillian Faderman).
b. To urge or exhort (someone to do something): "Writers like Emerson and Thoreau ... admonished us to develop ourselves according to nature" (E.D. Hirsch).
c. To remind (someone) of something forgotten or disregarded, as an obligation or a responsibility.
2. To reprove gently but earnestly: "Lincoln pursued his interests in defiance of established norms. Far from being praised, he was consistently admonished" (Joshua Wolf Shenk).

[Middle English amonishen, admonishen, alteration of amonesten, from Old French amonester, admonester, from Vulgar Latin *admonestāre, from Latin admonēre : ad-, ad- + monēre, to warn; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

ad·mon′ish·er n.
ad·mon′ish·ing·ly adv.
ad·mon′ish·ment n.
Synonyms: admonish, reprove, rebuke, reprimand, reproach
These verbs mean to correct or caution critically. Admonish implies the giving of advice or a warning in order to rectify or avoid something: "A gallows erected on an eminence admonished the offenders of the fate that awaited them" (William Hickling Prescott).
Reprove usually suggests a measured disapproval ranging from mild to emphatic: With a stern look, the teacher reproved the child for whispering in class.
Rebuke and reprimand both refer to sharp, often angry criticism from a higher authority: "Some of the most heated criticism ... has come from the Justice Department, which rarely rebukes other agencies in public" (Howard Kurtz)."A [university] committee ... asked its president to reprimand a scientist who tested gene-altered bacteria on trees" (New York Times).
Reproach refers to criticism, sometimes from oneself, arising from a sense of personal disappointment or moral disapproval: "He bitterly regretted his foolishness, and reproached himself for weakness of will" (J.R.R. Tolkien)."She never reproached him for his bullying manners at parties" (Louis Auchincloss).

admonish

(ədˈmɒnɪʃ)
vb (tr)
1. to reprove firmly but not harshly
2. to advise to do or against doing something; warn; caution
[C14: via Old French from Vulgar Latin admonestāre (unattested), from Latin admonēre to put one in mind of, from monēre to advise]
adˈmonisher, adˈmonitor n
admonition n
adˈmonitory adj

ad•mon•ish

(ædˈmɒn ɪʃ)

v.t.
1. to caution, advise, or counsel against something.
2. to reprove or scold, esp. in a mild and good-willed manner.
3. to urge to a duty or remind of an obligation.
[1275–1325; < Anglo-French, Old French amonester < Vulgar Latin *admonestāre, appar. derivative of Latin admonēre to remind, give advice to =ad- ad- + monēre to warn]
ad•mon′ish•er, n.
ad•mon′ish•ing•ly, adv.
ad•mon′ish•ment, n.
syn: See warn. See also reprimand.

admonish


Past participle: admonished
Gerund: admonishing

Imperative
admonish
admonish
Present
I admonish
you admonish
he/she/it admonishes
we admonish
you admonish
they admonish
Preterite
I admonished
you admonished
he/she/it admonished
we admonished
you admonished
they admonished
Present Continuous
I am admonishing
you are admonishing
he/she/it is admonishing
we are admonishing
you are admonishing
they are admonishing
Present Perfect
I have admonished
you have admonished
he/she/it has admonished
we have admonished
you have admonished
they have admonished
Past Continuous
I was admonishing
you were admonishing
he/she/it was admonishing
we were admonishing
you were admonishing
they were admonishing
Past Perfect
I had admonished
you had admonished
he/she/it had admonished
we had admonished
you had admonished
they had admonished
Future
I will admonish
you will admonish
he/she/it will admonish
we will admonish
you will admonish
they will admonish
Future Perfect
I will have admonished
you will have admonished
he/she/it will have admonished
we will have admonished
you will have admonished
they will have admonished
Future Continuous
I will be admonishing
you will be admonishing
he/she/it will be admonishing
we will be admonishing
you will be admonishing
they will be admonishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been admonishing
you have been admonishing
he/she/it has been admonishing
we have been admonishing
you have been admonishing
they have been admonishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been admonishing
you will have been admonishing
he/she/it will have been admonishing
we will have been admonishing
you will have been admonishing
they will have been admonishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been admonishing
you had been admonishing
he/she/it had been admonishing
we had been admonishing
you had been admonishing
they had been admonishing
Conditional
I would admonish
you would admonish
he/she/it would admonish
we would admonish
you would admonish
they would admonish
Past Conditional
I would have admonished
you would have admonished
he/she/it would have admonished
we would have admonished
you would have admonished
they would have admonished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.admonish - admonish or counsel in terms of someone's behavioradmonish - admonish or counsel in terms of someone's behavior; "I warned him not to go too far"; "I warn you against false assumptions"; "She warned him to be quiet"
warn - notify of danger, potential harm, or risk; "The director warned him that he might be fired"; "The doctor warned me about the dangers of smoking"
advise, counsel, rede - give advice to; "The teacher counsels troubled students"; "The lawyer counselled me when I was accused of tax fraud"
2.admonish - warn stronglyadmonish - warn strongly; put on guard    
warn - notify of danger, potential harm, or risk; "The director warned him that he might be fired"; "The doctor warned me about the dangers of smoking"
3.admonish - take to taskadmonish - take to task; "He admonished the child for his bad behavior"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"

admonish

verb
1. reprimand, caution, censure, rebuke, scold, berate, check, chide, tear into (informal), tell off (informal), reprove, upbraid, read the riot act to someone, carpet (informal), chew out (U.S. & Canad. informal), tear someone off a strip (Brit. informal), give someone a rocket (Brit. & N.Z. informal), slap someone on the wrist, rap someone over the knuckles They admonished me for taking risks with my health.
reprimand praise, applaud, compliment, congratulate, commend, big up (slang, chiefly Caribbean)
2. advise, suggest, warn, urge, recommend, counsel, caution, prescribe, exhort, enjoin, forewarn Your doctor may one day admonish you to improve your posture.

admonish

verb
1. To criticize for a fault or an offense:
Informal: bawl out, lambaste.
Slang: chew out.
Idioms: bring to task, call on the carpet, haul over the coals, let someone have it.
2. To notify (someone) of imminent danger or risk:
Translations
يُحَذِّر، يَنْصَح
napomenout
advareirettesætte
megint
aîvara
pabarimaspabarti
aizrādītbrīdināt
napomenúť
ihtar etmekuyarmak

admonish

[ədˈmɒnɪʃ] VT (frm)
1. (= reprimand) → reprender, amonestar (for por)
2. (= warn) → advertir, prevenir
3. (= advise) → aconsejar (to do hacer)

admonish

[ədˈmɒnɪʃ] vtréprimander
to admonish sb for sth → réprimander qn pour qch

admonish

vtermahnen (for wegen)

admonish

[ədˈmɒnɪʃ] vt (frm) (reprimand) → ammonire
to admonish sb (for) → riprendere qn (per)

admonish

(ədˈmoniʃ) verb
to scold or rebuke. The judge admonished the young man for fighting in the street.
ˌadmoˈnition (ӕd-) noun

admonish

vt. advertir, amonestar.
References in classic literature ?
And let me in this place movingly admonish you, ye ship-owners of Nantucket
Dig--dig--dig--until an impatient movement from one of the two passengers would admonish him to pull up the window, draw his arm securely through the leathern strap, and speculate upon the two slumbering forms, until his mind lost its hold of them, and they again slid away into the bank and the grave.
The circumstances of the dispute between Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respecting the land at Wyoming, admonish us not to be sanguine in expecting an easy accommodation of such differences.
If, in a few scattered instances, a brighter aspect is presented, they serve only as exceptions to admonish us of the general truth; and by their lustre to darken the gloom of the adverse prospect to which they are contrasted.
The policeman looked up, and, catching his eye, raised his finger to admonish silence.
The old count began irresolutely to admonish Nicholas and beg him to abandon his purpose.
She simply continued to be mild in her temper, inflexible in her judgment, disposed to admonish her husband, and able to frustrate him by stratagem.
In the house are duties and annoyances, servants to exhort and admonish, furniture, and meals; but out there blessings crowd round me at every step-- it is there that I am sorry for the unkindness in me, for those selfish thoughts that are so much worse than they feel; it is there that all my sins and silliness are forgiven, there that I feel protected and at home, and every flower and weed is a friend and every tree a lover.
In patient endurance of evil, she forgets it is our duty to admonish our neighbours of their transgressions.