adumbration


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Related to adumbration: aggrandizement

ad·um·brate

 (ăd′əm-brāt′, ə-dŭm′-)
tr.v. ad·um·brat·ed, ad·um·brat·ing, ad·um·brates
1. To give a sketchy outline of.
2. To prefigure indistinctly; foreshadow.
3. To disclose partially or guardedly.
4. To overshadow; shadow or obscure.

[Latin adumbrāre, adumbrāt-, to represent in outline : ad-, ad- + umbra, shadow.]

ad′um·bra′tion n.
ad·um′bra·tive (ə-dŭm′brə-tĭv) adj.
ad·um′bra·tive·ly adv.

adumbration

a sketchy representation of something.
See also: Representation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adumbration - the act of providing vague advance indicationsadumbration - the act of providing vague advance indications; representing beforehand
prediction, anticipation, prevision - the act of predicting (as by reasoning about the future)
2.adumbration - a sketchy or imperfect or faint representation
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

adumbration

[ˌædʌmˈbreɪʃən] N (frm) → bosquejo m; (= foreshadowing) → presagio m, anuncio m

adumbration

n (liter)
(of theory)Umriss m
(of event)Ankündigung f, → Anzeichen nt
References in classic literature ?
He was as splendid a brute--an adumbration of the splendid human conquerors and rulers, higher on the ladder of evolution, who have appeared in other times and places.
Nevertheless, as this narrative will show later on, we betrayed glimmering adumbrations of the monogamy that was later to give power to, and make mighty, such tribes as embraced it.
A great king-post, half a hundred feet in length, seasoned by centuries of superstitious care, carven into dynasties of gods, each superimposed, each helmeted, each seated in the open mouth of a crocodile, was slung by ropes, twisted of climbing vegetable parasites, from the apex of a tripod of three great forest trunks, themselves carved into grinning and grotesque adumbrations of man's modern concepts of art and god.
There are indeed continuities here, though Coffey sometimes seems to overstate Goodwin's adumbration of post-Lockean "rational religion.
There is something as yet unexplained about the adumbration of Plato's 'eidetic' by a philosopher who (cf.
Faulkner's novel, set outside the confines of his own comforting "postage stamp of native soil," holds out for something beyond language: an adumbration that the gap, the no-man's land of language now called the aporia, can be bridged (Lion 255).
The chapter entitled "Ceci tuera cela" of Notre-Dame de Paris (1: 618-28) presents the technical evolution of art forms as the adumbration of societal transformation: easily duplicated print will supersede unique architectural achievements, and democracy will similarly replace monarchy/theocracy.
For Jews, the continuously negative portrayals of the Jewish leaders, primarily priests, and the Jewish populace was, quite simply, the newest adumbration of antisemitism--a modern, technological "Passion play" not radically other than that produced once every decade in Oberammergau, Germany; the very same play which saw Adolf Hitler in attendance and confirming for him and others of his ilk the Jew as eternal and perpetual enemy.
Never once does this very smart writer with many thousands of words to play with even offer a hint of an adumbration of a clue that it isn't an unequivocal moral wrong to give someone a job doing your domestic work.
All the talk about the ancients versus the moderns conceals the real game, which is to present the past as a backdrop to late modernity, or as the adumbration of "principles" that we only see given full form in contemporary America.
Northern Europe, from slightly after the First Crusade onward, also pioneered in the adumbration of increasingly irrational anti-Jewish slanders, beginning with allegations of malicious murder and proceeding to charges of ritual killing, blood use, well poisoning, and host desecration.
But once you have established that what people say is merely a plausible cover for what they really mean, the adumbration of what they really mean becomes fraught with imaginative possibilities, besides being for the media a much more essential public service than merely relaying to the public what they think they mean.