adventuress

(redirected from adventuresses)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to adventuresses: adventurous

ad·ven·tur·ess

 (ăd-vĕn′chər-ĭs)
n.
A woman who seeks social and financial advancement by unscrupulous means. See Usage Note at -ess.

adventuress

(ədˈvɛntʃərɪs)
n
1. a woman who seeks adventure, esp one who seeks success or money through daring exploits
2. a woman who seeks money or power by unscrupulous means
3. (Commerce) a speculator

ad•ven•tur•ess

(ædˈvɛn tʃər ɪs)

n.
a woman who schemes to win social position, wealth, etc., by questionable means.
[1745–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adventuress - a woman adventureradventuress - a woman adventurer      
adventurer, venturer - a person who enjoys taking risks
Translations

adventuress

[ədˈventʃərɪs] Naventurera f

adventuress

n (pej)Abenteurerin f

adventuress

[ədˈvɛntʃrɪs] navventuriera
References in classic literature ?
Woman that adventured were adventuresses, and the connotation was not nice.
I knew all this because I read 'Seaside Library'* novels, in which, with the exception of the villains and adventuresses, all men and women thought beautiful thoughts, spoke a beautiful tongue, and performed glorious deeds.
This certificate of honour was obviously intended now to prove Katerina Ivanovna's right to open a boarding-school; but she had armed herself with it chiefly with the object of overwhelming "those two stuck-up draggletails" if they came to the dinner, and proving incontestably that Katerina Ivanovna was of the most noble, "she might even say aristocratic family, a colonel's daughter and was far superior to certain adventuresses who have been so much to the fore of late.
During the Roaring Twenties in France when sport literature reached its peak and when all kinds of champions and adventuresses had an unprecedented popularity, the sportswoman figure had a place in the literature.
Their very mobility both embodied and challenged regional cliches: as civic leaders in Pasadena and transient outsiders in Santa Fe; as adventuresses in Cairo and society women in the American West; as nurturers of regionalist artists in California and romantic patrons of Nuevo Mexicano craftspeople in New Mexico; and as astute businesswomen and devoted family members.