adverbial

(redirected from adverbials)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

ad·ver·bi·al

 (ăd-vûr′bē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being an adverb.
n.
An adverbial element or phrase.

ad·ver′bi·al·ly adv.

adverbial

(ædˈvɜːbɪəl)
n
(Grammar) a word or group of words playing the grammatical role of an adverb, such as in the rain in the sentence I'm singing in the rain
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to an adverb or adverbial
adˈverbially adv

ad•ver•bi•al

(ædˈvɜr bi əl)

adj.
1. of, functioning as, or forming an adverb.
n.
2. a word or group of words functioning as an adverb.
[1605–15]
ad•ver′bi•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adverbial - a word or group of words function as an adverb
adverb - a word that modifies something other than a noun
Adj.1.adverbial - of or relating to or functioning as an adverb; "adverbial syntax"
Translations
ظَرْفِي
příslovečný
adverbiel
adverbanpriložni
határozói
atviksorîs-; atvikslegur
adverbial
príslovkový
zarf niteliğindezarfımsı

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːbɪəl] ADJadverbial

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːrbiəl] adj [expression] → adverbial(e)

adverbial

adj, adverbially
advadverbial

adverbial

[ædˈvɜːbɪəl] adjavverbiale

adverb

(ˈӕdvəːb) noun
a word used before or after a verb, before an adjective or preposition, or with another adverb to show time, manner, place, degree etc. Yesterday he looked more carefully in the box, and there he found a very small key with a hole right through it.
adˈverbial adjective
adˈverbially adverb

adverbial

a. adverbial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turning to the question of the relevance of adverbials in the expression of perfect meaning, Table 2 below gives the raw numbers and percentages for the use of adverbial support, that is, the distribution of verbal forms with and without the presence of an adverbial of time, by geographical variety.
This means that these texts are situation- dependent and are loaded with the features of many adverbials used for deixis, as mentioned above.
As indicated in Table 1, for Grammar I students, the three most helpful topics in their writing classes were subject-verb agreement (91%), quantifiers (82%) and adverbials (80%).
As shown, to predominates over 0 both with and without intervening elements, irrespective of whether noun phrases, pronominals or adverbials are involved.
b) if they are realized as prepositional phrases conveying syntactic functions of adverbials and postmodifiers of nouns (DuUkova 1988: 578-580; Janigova 2008: 115):
Among the topics are a grammatical sketch, segmental phonology, nominal and adjectival compounds, ideophones and onomatopoeia, postpositions and adverbials, verbal derivation, verb phrases and predicate structure, relativization and clause nominalization, clause chaining and subordination, quotative constructions, and grammatical pragmatics.
If a conceptual space is allowed between categories, they could be considered members of a third class and perform a different syntactic function, because the functions in question display properties that are different from the properties of subject complements and different from the properties of adverbials.
After the most important elements of the sentence are already in place, the adverbials can show up.
After that mood/attitudinal adverbials "surely" `haply" "truly" and "certainly" are common.
For example, Year 4 students can be introduced to the effect of adverbials of circumstance through the juxtaposition of the following texts:
In fact, the long-vowel reduplicated i-stems are marginal in the Rigveda (except for sasahi-) and are rarely attested with structural case objects or adverbials, the syntactic hallmarks of the type.