adversative


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to adversative: adversative conjunction

ad·ver·sa·tive

 (ăd-vûr′sə-tĭv)
adj.
Expressing antithesis or opposition: the adversative conjunction but.
n.
A word that expresses antithesis or opposition.

[Latin adversātīvus, from adversātus, past participle of adversārī, to oppose, from adversus, against; see adverse.]

ad·ver′sa·tive·ly adv.

adversative

(ədˈvɜːsətɪv) grammar
adj
(Linguistics) (of a word, phrase, or clause) implying opposition or contrast. But and although are adversative conjunctions introducing adversative clauses
n
(Linguistics) an adversative word or speech element

ad•ver•sa•tive

(ædˈvɜr sə tɪv)

adj.
1. expressing contrariety, opposition, or antithesis: “But” is an adversative conjunction.
n.
2. an adversative word.
[1525–35; < Late Latin]
ad•ver′sa•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.adversative - expressing antithesis or opposition; "the adversative conjunction `but' in `poor but happy'"
disjunctive - serving or tending to divide or separate
References in periodicals archive ?
The adversative and emphatic "But suddenly" dramatically indicates the gap between what the woman wants/imagines the man to do and what the man actually does.
The results of the analysis revealed that, while there is no statistically significant correlation between the reading comprehension scores of the good readers and the numbers of the connectives such as temporal, causal, adversative and additive in the texts forming the study database, a negative correlation was found between the reading comprehension scores of the poor readers and concession connectives at the level of r = -0.
Other factors such as personal conflict, a controlling or coercive management style and external standards were found to be negatively related to autonomous motivation and hence were adversative to employee creativity and innovation at the workplace.
Linguistic means may be subdivided into the following constituents groups: prospective, deictic, adversative, referential and summarizing.
Another manifestation of low nominalization is the ability of a relative construction to be coordinated with the main clause by means of an adversative conjunction: (25)
However, the adversative side effects of lung cancer therapeutic drugs could pose a challenge to the growth of this market.
DOMINIC MARTIN, "Rivalite et marches: une ethique adversative pour les agents economiques.
All three words are adversative conjunctions; see Schlesinger 1928: [section] 123.
2) ADVERSATIVE, connecting words and expressions that are opposite in thought; as but, yet, still, however, while, only, etc.
Thus, children's deep commitment to sociality is also manifested in situations of adversative character.
132) Writing for the majority, Justice Ginsberg noted that if even one woman could benefit from VMI's adversative teaching method, VMI's gender-based policy could not pass intermediate scrutiny.
Having already exposed the ills of unfettered access in terms of quantity of information, rather than relevance or quality, this article, in Part III will then posit an understanding of privacy in this context--as part of access rather than adversative to it.