aedicule


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to aedicule: Aedicula

aedicule

(ˈɛdɪˌkjuːl)
n
(Architecture) an opening such as a door or a window, framed by columns on either side, and a pediment above
[C19: from Latin aediculum small house, from aedēs building]

aedicule

- A small room or structure used as a shrine—or a niche for a statue.
See also related terms for small room.

aedicule

A small shrine or tabernacle of wood or stone, framed by columns and surmounted by an entablature and pediment.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It represents a very special place to Christians all over the world for containing the tomb of Jesus the Christ and many monuments of his memory, like the Stone of Anointing, where Jesus' body is said to have been anointed before burial, the altar of the Crucifixion, the rock of Calvary as seen in the Chapel of Adam, the Aedicule, the Prison of Christ, etc.
The burial shelf is now enclosed by a small structure known as the Edicule, a word that comes from the Latin aedicule, meaning little house, which was last reconstructed in 1808-1810 after being destroyed in a fire.
Many architectural effects are achieved in that way, by the "nesting" of one aedicule within another, so that the order radiates outward from the smallest unit across the facade of the building.
12) The prison under the tower of the church steeple from the Royal Court of Moldavia, compared with the terrible Ottoman prison Aedicule, was the ruthless sign of death because, wrote the author, people locked up here "had no hope to survive.
The domed edifice behind King Herod as he questions Christ on a tabernacle shutter at Oxford painted by the Florentine San Gaggio Master a few years later, and the gothicized aedicule in Giotto's Ognissanti Madonna of about 1310 present alternative forms for the same device.
An aedicule is a small building, as a shrine, imitating the form of the larger building.
29) Acutia Blanda's aedicule has, besides the image of Acutia Blanda herself, two additional reliefs on the sides of the monument.
He writes eloquently of the way in which "the aedicule," a miniature semblance of house, is a device that was used often in Classical and Mediaeval architecture and painting to enframe and give importance to a god or saint or, as in the case of Pompeian Wall Painting, to fill an area with images of places that could be inhabited [Summerson, John.
So, beneath layers of accretion and the aedicule of the Holy Sepulchre, through which modern tourists pass in an endless reverent queue, is the genuine rock tomb.
A sculpture, a large statue of Hermes, was built into its own recessed aedicule above the door; that's the nose.
But the key element for the present discussion is the tall Gothic aedicule (here, as often subsequently, with inscribed trefoil), the earliest surviving representative of another fundamental component of the late-medieval wall-tomb in Italy.
Within this grand, airy volume, a folded concrete canopy marks the precise, even ceremonial point-of-access; the soffit of this contemporary aedicule is lined by the bottom flanges of steel beams and is inset with grids of glass block.