aerodynamics

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aerodynamics
top: high drag on a less aerodynamic shape
bottom: low drag on a more aerodynamic shape

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

 (âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The dynamics of bodies moving relative to gases, especially the interaction of moving objects with the atmosphere.

aer′o·dy·nam′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

aerodynamics

(ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the study of the dynamics of gases, esp of the forces acting on a body passing through air. Compare aerostatics1
ˌaerodyˈnamic adj
ˌaerodyˈnamically adv
ˌaerodyˈnamicist n

aer•o•dy•nam•ics

(ˌɛər oʊ daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the motion of air and other gases and of the effects of such motion on bodies in the gas.
[1830–40]
aer`o•dy•nam′ic, aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal, adj.
aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

(âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
The study of the movement of air and other gases and of the forces involved in their movements. It is also the study of the way objects, such as cars and airplanes, interact with air when they are moving through it.
Did You Know? The two primary forces in aerodynamics are lift and drag. Lift refers to forces perpendicular to the surface of an object (such as an airplane wing) that is traveling through the air. For example, airplane wings are designed so that when they move through the air, an area of low pressure is created above the wing; the low pressure produces a lift force that pulls the wing upward (in a direction perpendicular to the wing's broad surface), and the wing pulls the airplane up with it. Drag forces, which are parallel to the object's surface, are usually caused by friction. Drag makes it more difficult for airplane wings to slice through the air, and so drag forces push against the forward motion of the craft. Large wings usually generate a lot of lift, but they also produce a lot of drag. In designing airplane wings, engineers need to take into account such factors as the speed and altitude at which the plane will fly, so that they can find a wing shape that balances lift and drag as well as possible.

aerodynamics

the branch of dynamics that studies the motions of air and other gases, especially with regard to bodies in motion in these substances. See also aviation. — aerodynamic, aerodynamical, adj.
See also: Atmosphere

aerodynamics

The study of the flow of gases, especially air.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flowaerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flow
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
Translations
aerodynamika
aerodinamika

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] Naerodinámica fsing

aerodynamics

[ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] naérodynamique f

aerodynamics

n
sing (subject) → Aerodynamik f
pl (of plane etc)Aerodynamik f

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] nsgaerodinamica
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike conventional wind tunnels, the National Transonic Facility can duplicate the aerodynamics of the flight environment, even with small scale models," says facility chief aerodynamicist Rich Wahls.
I can push the team as much as I want and I can ask about improvements and when they will come, but I am not an engineer or an aerodynamicist.
The Coanda Effect has been discovered in1930 by the Romanian aerodynamicist Henri-Marie Coanda (1885-1972).
The civic society has been approached by a professional aerodynamicist, who says already high winds prevailing along the Swansea Bay coastline could be increased to tornado-type speeds by the height and shape of the planned Earthquake tower.
Saffman, an aerodynamicist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
Chief aerodynamicist Mark Handford has helped take the car forward in leaps and bounds.
Additional team members include: Catherine Crawford , aerodynamicist, principal of Crawford Composites and one of the few women around the globe supervising a race team, which she currently does in the IMSA TUDOR United SportsCar Championship; Lauren Elkins , motorsports engineer, track support technician and data analysis manager, who brings multiple years in IndyCar and sports car racing to the team; Jessica Rowe , a junior design engineer with a variety of race experience, both at track and in the design office; and Barbara Burns , a skilled motorsport professional specializing in communications, public relations, event management and media training for young professional athletes and drivers.
Last night I was grilling the aerodynamicist and asking questions about the car and pushing for certain things that should be added that other people have.
Among a panel of industry experts speaking at the conference, Terzi, the Italian former chief aerodynamicist of the BMW-Williams Formula 1 team, says an intelligent routing system is another key Superbus feature.
They are driver Wing Cdr Andy Green, project director Richard Noble and chief aerodynamicist Ron Ayres.