aerodynamics

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aerodynamics
top: high drag on a less aerodynamic shape
bottom: low drag on a more aerodynamic shape

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

 (âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The dynamics of bodies moving relative to gases, especially the interaction of moving objects with the atmosphere.

aer′o·dy·nam′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

aerodynamics

(ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the study of the dynamics of gases, esp of the forces acting on a body passing through air. Compare aerostatics1
ˌaerodyˈnamic adj
ˌaerodyˈnamically adv
ˌaerodyˈnamicist n

aer•o•dy•nam•ics

(ˌɛər oʊ daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the motion of air and other gases and of the effects of such motion on bodies in the gas.
[1830–40]
aer`o•dy•nam′ic, aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal, adj.
aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

(âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
The study of the movement of air and other gases and of the forces involved in their movements. It is also the study of the way objects, such as cars and airplanes, interact with air when they are moving through it.
Did You Know? The two primary forces in aerodynamics are lift and drag. Lift refers to forces perpendicular to the surface of an object (such as an airplane wing) that is traveling through the air. For example, airplane wings are designed so that when they move through the air, an area of low pressure is created above the wing; the low pressure produces a lift force that pulls the wing upward (in a direction perpendicular to the wing's broad surface), and the wing pulls the airplane up with it. Drag forces, which are parallel to the object's surface, are usually caused by friction. Drag makes it more difficult for airplane wings to slice through the air, and so drag forces push against the forward motion of the craft. Large wings usually generate a lot of lift, but they also produce a lot of drag. In designing airplane wings, engineers need to take into account such factors as the speed and altitude at which the plane will fly, so that they can find a wing shape that balances lift and drag as well as possible.

aerodynamics

the branch of dynamics that studies the motions of air and other gases, especially with regard to bodies in motion in these substances. See also aviation. — aerodynamic, aerodynamical, adj.
See also: Atmosphere

aerodynamics

The study of the flow of gases, especially air.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flowaerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flow
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
Translations
aerodynamika
aerodinamika

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] Naerodinámica fsing

aerodynamics

[ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] naérodynamique f

aerodynamics

n
sing (subject) → Aerodynamik f
pl (of plane etc)Aerodynamik f

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] nsgaerodinamica
References in periodicals archive ?
Vehicle aerodynamicists have also been rummaging through the 488 Challenge spare parts box, the most notable bodywork tweaks being the new front and rear diffusers, which increase downforce by up to 20 percent.
It took quite a bit of study by the aerodynamicists, but the designers had to work hard to modify the chassis so the halo could survive the mandated loads.
The problem is that the aerodynamicists then looked at it and said 'well, that affects the rear wing, so we don't want that'.
These are top-class engineers, aerodynamicists, vehicle dynamics engineers - the skill level is high and we need to maintain and we need to maintain access to that talent.
Therefore, the ability to predict the self-soiling phenomenon early in a vehicle development programme would provide a useful insight and allow designers and aerodynamicists the opportunity to resolve soiling issues alongside the more usual areas of concern such as drag reduction, aero-acoustics and cross-wind stability.
After every race I am in the factory, debriefing, engineering and working with the aerodynamicists closely.
Developed in the 1980s at the Air Force Research Laboratory by five computer scientists who were also aerodynamicists, the system was designed to automatically fly an airplane away from a hazardous situation, preventing the loss of the pilot and aircraft.
By adding vertical slots in the outer ends of the front fascia and wheel wells, aerodynamicists were able to form air curtains that create a wall of air that flows around the outer edge of the front wheels.
5 million man-hours of work by the UK's leading scientists, aerodynamicists and systems engineers from 250 UK companies.
5 million man-hours of work by the UK s leading scientists, aerodynamicists and systems engineers from 250 UK companies.
Boeing aerodynamicists used advanced computational fluid dynamics to combine rake tip technology with a dual feather winglet concept into one advanced treatment.
There were maybe 100 really advanced users, including aerodynamicists from NASA and everywhere else, who were innovators.