affection


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af·fec·tion

 (ə-fĕk′shən)
n.
1. A tender feeling toward another; fondness.
2. often affections Feeling or emotion: an unbalanced state of affections.
3. A disposition to feel, do, or say; a propensity.
4. Obsolete Prejudice; partiality.

[Middle English affeccioun, from Old French affection, from Latin affectiō, affectiōn-, from affectus, past participle of afficere, to affect, influence; see affect1.]

af·fec′tion·al adj.
af·fec′tion·al·ly adv.

affection

(əˈfɛkʃən)
n
1. a feeling of fondness or tenderness for a person or thing; attachment
2. (often plural) emotion, feeling, or sentiment: to play on a person's affections.
3. (Pathology) pathol any disease or pathological condition
4. (Psychology) psychol any form of mental functioning that involves emotion. See also affect12
5. the act of affecting or the state of being affected
6. archaic inclination or disposition
[C13: from Latin affectiōn- disposition, from afficere to affect1]
afˈfectional adj

af•fec•tion

(əˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
1. fond attachment, devotion, or love.
2. Often, affections.
a. emotion; feeling: to let the affections sway our reason.
b. the emotional realm of love: to hold a place in one's affections.
3. a diseased condition: a gouty affection.
4. the act of affecting, or the state of being affected.
5. bent or disposition of mind.
[1200–50; Middle English < Old French < Latin affectiō]
af•fec′tion•less, adj.

Affection

 

See Also: FRIENDSHIP, LOVE

  1. Affectionate as a miser toward his money —Anon
  2. (She had an) affection for her children almost like a cool governess —D. H. Lawrence
  3. Affection is the youth of the heart, and thought is the heart’s maturity —Kahlil Gibran

    Gibran completed the simile with “But oratory is its senility.”

  4. Affection, like melancholy, magnifies trifles —Leigh Hunt
  5. Affection, like spring flowers, breaks through the most frozen ground at last —Jeremy Bentham
  6. Affection, like the nut within the shell, wants freedom —Dion Boucicault
  7. Affection or love … intended for someone else and spilled accidentally like a bottle of ink under a dragging sleeve —Diane Wakoski
  8. Affections are like slippers; they will wear out —Edgar Saltus
  9. The affections, like conscience, are rather to be led than driven —Thomas Fuller
  10. Her cowlike, awkward affection surrounding him like a moist fog —Hank Searls
  11. The human affections, like the solar heat, lose their intensity as they depart from the center —Alexander Hamilton
  12. My affection has no bottom, like the Bay of Portugal —William Shakespeare

    The shorter, more commonly used “Affection is like a bottomless well” was more than likely inspired by this comparison from As You Like It

  13. She was like a cat in her fondness for nearness, for stroking, touching, nestling —Katherine Anne Porter
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.affection - a positive feeling of likingaffection - a positive feeling of liking; "he had trouble expressing the affection he felt"; "the child won everyone's heart"; "the warmness of his welcome made us feel right at home"
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
attachment, fond regard - a feeling of affection for a person or an institution
protectiveness - a feeling of protective affection
regard, respect - a feeling of friendship and esteem; "she mistook his manly regard for love"; "he inspires respect"
soft spot - a sentimental affection; "she had a soft spot for her youngest son"

affection

affection

noun
1. The condition of being closely tied to another by affection or faith:
2. A complex and usually strong subjective response, such as love or hate:
Translations
عَطْف، حُنُو، حُب
náklonostsympatie
hengivenhedkærlighedømhed
vonzalom
hlÿhugur, ástúî
meiliaimeilusprielankumassimpatija
pieķeršanāssimpātijasafektsietekmeietekmēšana
naklonjenost

affection

[əˈfekʃən] Nafecto m (for, towards a hacia) → cariño m
to transfer one's affectionsdar su amor a otro/a

affection

[əˈfɛkʃən] naffection f
He has a special place in the affections of the public → Il est très aimé du public.
to feel affection for sb → avoir de l'affection pour qn
to win sb's affection → gagner l'affection de qn

affection

n
(= fondness)Zuneigung f no pl(for, towards zu); to win somebody’s affections (dated, hum)jds Zuneigung gewinnen; I have or feel a great affection for herich mag sie sehr gerne; don’t you even feel any affection for her at all?fühlst du denn gar nichts für sie?; you could show a little more affection toward(s) medu könntest mir gegenüber etwas mehr Gefühl zeigen; children who lacked affectionKinder, denen die Liebe fehlte; everybody needs a little affectionjeder braucht ein bisschen Liebe; he has a special place in her affectionser nimmt einen besonderen Platz in ihrem Herzen ein; display of affectionAusdruck mvon Zärtlichkeit
(Med) → Erkrankung f, → Affektion f (spec)

affection

[əˈfɛkʃn] naffetto

affection

(əˈfekʃən) noun
liking or fondness. I have great affection for her, but she never shows any affection towards me.
afˈfectionate (-nət) adjective
having or showing affection. an affectionate child; She is very affectionate towards her mother.
afˈfectionately adverb

af·fec·tion

n. [sickness] afección, dolencia, enfermedad; [feeling] expresión de cariño, afecto o afección.

affection

n cariño, afecto
References in classic literature ?
Tell them I think of them by day, pray for them by night, and find my best comfort in their affection at all times.
Always when she had thought of the matter, it had seemed to her that in town all must be gaiety and life, that there men and women must live happily and freely, giving and taking friendship and affection as one takes the feel of a wind on the cheek.
It was not far to the native's hut from the place where the jaguar had been killed, and there Tom and Ned underwent another demonstration of affection as soon as those of Tal's immediate family and the other natives understood what had happened.
He made me see her again, feel her presence, revived all my old affection for her.
She was not accustomed to an outward and spoken expression of affection, either in herself or in others.
Duncan ceased speaking; for while his eyes were riveted on those of Alice, who had turned toward him with the eagerness of filial affection, to catch his words, the same strong, horrid cry, as before, filled the air, and rendered him mute.
During our travels, the Indians entertained me well; and their affection for me was so great, that they utterly refused to leave me there with the others, although the Governor offered them one hundred pounds Sterling for me, on purpose to give me a parole to go home.
Malbone's miniature, though from the same original, was far inferior to Hepzibah's air-drawn picture, at which affection and sorrowful remembrance wrought together.
And yet, though invariably happiest elsewhere, there is within me a feeling for Old Salem, which, in lack of a betterphrase, I must be content to call affection.
She expressed in her little way an extraordinary detachment from disagreeable duties, looking to me, however, with a great childish light that seemed to offer it as a mere result of the affection she had conceived for my person, which had rendered necessary that she should follow me.
To all this I joyously assented; for besides the affection I now felt for Queequeg, he was an experienced harpooneer, and as such, could not fail to be of great usefulness to one, who, like me, was wholly ignorant of the mysteries of whaling, though well acquainted with the sea, as known to merchant seamen.
Their affection was always to subside into friendship.