affectivity


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af·fec·tive

 (ə-fĕk′tĭv)
adj. Psychology
1. Influenced by or resulting from the emotions.
2. Concerned with or arousing feelings or emotions; emotional.

af·fec′tive·ly adv.
af′fec·tiv′i·ty (ăf′ĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

affectivity

noun
A complex and usually strong subjective response, such as love or hate:
Translations

affectivity

[ˌæfekˈtɪvətɪ] Nafectividad f
References in periodicals archive ?
PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor is likely to the fastest growing segment during the forecast period, due to affectivity of the treatment as clinical data showed double survival rate.
When thinking about the family," said Boston College's Hosffman Ospino, a co-chair of the project, "theologians, bishops, and public intellectuals --the three constituencies that the CCP brings together for its meetings --must bring the best of our tradition to reflect on how to best care for those wounded by divorce and the impact of such reality on their families; explore how affectivity grounds all human relationships; and come to terms with the demands of raising children in the Catholic faith in today's world.
Putin questioned the affectivity of the airstrikes carried out by the US against ISIS as they have "yielded no tangible results so far," adding that Russia has taken several steps to form an international anti-terrorism coalition.
He goes so far as to postulate the need, in philosophical anthropology, to speak not only of intellect and will but also of "heart" as the seat of distinctively human affectivity.
Philo, Bali and Cis studied the role of negative affectivity and emotion regulation in distinguishing depression and anxiety in teenagers.
To our knowledge, no empirical study has been published to date that has created one fully encompassing measure of competitiveness that assesses all of the different dimensions: specifically, general competitiveness, dominance, affectivity, and personal enhancement.
Avoiding ill-conceived capital intensive mega projects the Consultants', would take into account cost affectivity i.
Film analyses, interviews, newspaper film reviews, and scholarly articles explore topics including the ideal of virgin motherhood, sexuality in classical and third-wave films, mothers' autonomous identity, maternal affectivity in Mexican films, and making the private realm political.
In contrast to the contemporary tendency to read early modern literary representations of the emotions through a post-Cartesian lens of dematerialized affectivity, Paster argues for their rematerialization by recognizing that "what is now emotional figuration for us was bodily reality for the early moderns" (26).
A list of symptoms includes depressed mood, anxiety, affectivity, decreased interest in activities, irritability, anger, lethargy, changes in appetite, breast tenderness, and/or bloating.
His typhonic affectivity, symbolised by the torrential waters, that feeds the imago also indicates that her intra-psychic presence will sooner or later be swallowed by the flow of life-and-death itself.
The main focus, however, is on determining how well those variables stand up when included with other key correlates of wellbeing, including employment commitment, self-esteem, financial strain, and affectivity (PA, NA, and domain-specific satisfaction).