affront

(redirected from affronting)
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af·front

 (ə-frŭnt′)
tr.v. af·front·ed, af·front·ing, af·fronts
1. To insult intentionally, especially openly. See Synonyms at offend.
2.
a. To meet defiantly; confront: affront danger.
b. Obsolete To meet or encounter (another) face to face.
n.
1. An open or intentional offense, slight, or insult: Such behavior is an affront to society.
2. Obsolete A hostile encounter or meeting.

[Middle English afrounten, from Old French afronter : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin frōns, front-, face; see front.]

affront

(əˈfrʌnt)
n
a deliberate insult
vb (tr)
1. to insult, esp openly
2. to offend the pride or dignity of
3. obsolete to confront defiantly
[C14: from Old French afronter to strike in the face, from Vulgar Latin affrontāre (unattested), from the Latin phrase ad frontem to the face]

af•front

(əˈfrʌnt)

n.
1. a deliberate act or display of disrespect; insult.
v.t.
2. to offend by an open manifestation of disrespect or insolence.
3. Archaic. to front on; face.
4. Obs. to encounter; confront.
[1300–50; Middle English afrounten < Middle French af(f)ronter to strike in the face]
af•front′ed•ly, adv.
af•front′ed•ness, n.
syn: See insult.

affront


Past participle: affronted
Gerund: affronting

Imperative
affront
affront
Present
I affront
you affront
he/she/it affronts
we affront
you affront
they affront
Preterite
I affronted
you affronted
he/she/it affronted
we affronted
you affronted
they affronted
Present Continuous
I am affronting
you are affronting
he/she/it is affronting
we are affronting
you are affronting
they are affronting
Present Perfect
I have affronted
you have affronted
he/she/it has affronted
we have affronted
you have affronted
they have affronted
Past Continuous
I was affronting
you were affronting
he/she/it was affronting
we were affronting
you were affronting
they were affronting
Past Perfect
I had affronted
you had affronted
he/she/it had affronted
we had affronted
you had affronted
they had affronted
Future
I will affront
you will affront
he/she/it will affront
we will affront
you will affront
they will affront
Future Perfect
I will have affronted
you will have affronted
he/she/it will have affronted
we will have affronted
you will have affronted
they will have affronted
Future Continuous
I will be affronting
you will be affronting
he/she/it will be affronting
we will be affronting
you will be affronting
they will be affronting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been affronting
you have been affronting
he/she/it has been affronting
we have been affronting
you have been affronting
they have been affronting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been affronting
you will have been affronting
he/she/it will have been affronting
we will have been affronting
you will have been affronting
they will have been affronting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been affronting
you had been affronting
he/she/it had been affronting
we had been affronting
you had been affronting
they had been affronting
Conditional
I would affront
you would affront
he/she/it would affront
we would affront
you would affront
they would affront
Past Conditional
I would have affronted
you would have affronted
he/she/it would have affronted
we would have affronted
you would have affronted
they would have affronted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.affront - a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespectaffront - a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of deliberate disrespect; "turning his back on me was a deliberate insult"
offense, offensive activity, discourtesy, offence - a lack of politeness; a failure to show regard for others; wounding the feelings or others
indignity - an affront to one's dignity or self-esteem
scandalisation, scandalization, outrage - the act of scandalizing
Verb1.affront - treat, mention, or speak to rudelyaffront - treat, mention, or speak to rudely; "He insulted her with his rude remarks"; "the student who had betrayed his classmate was dissed by everyone"
spite, wound, bruise, injure, offend, hurt - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"

affront

verb
1. offend, anger, provoke, outrage, insult, annoy, vex, displease, pique, put or get your back up, slight One example that particularly affronted him was at the world championships.
noun
1. insult, wrong, injury, abuse, offence, slight, outrage, provocation, slur, indignity, slap in the face (informal), vexation She has taken my enquiry as a personal affront.

affront

verb
To cause resentment or hurt by callous, rude behavior:
Idioms: add insult to injury, give offense to.
noun
An act that offends a person's sense of pride or dignity:
Translations
إهَانَة عَلَنِيَّهيُهِين عَلَانِيَّة
urazitveřejná urážka
fornærmefornærmelse
sérelem
móîgamóîgun
įžeidimasįžeisti
apvainojumsapvainot

affront

[əˈfrʌnt]
A. Nafrenta f, ofensa f
to be an affront toafrentar a
B. VTofender, afrentar
to be affrontedofenderse

affront

[əˈfrʌnt] naffront m
to be an affront to sb/sth → être un affront à qn/qch

affront

vtbeleidigen
nBeleidigung f(to sb jds, to sth für etw), Affront m(to gegen); such poverty is an affront to our national pridesolche Armut verletzt unseren Nationalstolz

affront

[əˈfrʌnt]
1. naffronto
2. vtfare un affronto a
to be affronted (by) → offendersi (per)

affront

(əˈfrant) noun
an insult, usually one made in public. His remarks were obviously intended as an affront to her.
verb
to insult or offend. We were affronted by the offhand way in which they treated us.

affront

v. hacer frente, confrontar; encararse.
References in classic literature ?
She took the first opportunity of affronting her mother-in-law on the occasion, talking to her so expressively of her brother's great expectations, of Mrs.
For the opposite reason, Prince John hated and contemned the few Saxon families of consequence which subsisted in England, and omitted no opportunity of mortifying and affronting them; being conscious that his person and pretensions were disliked by them, as well as by the greater part of the English commons, who feared farther innovation upon their rights and liberties, from a sovereign of John's licentious and tyrannical disposition.
When I attended the King in order to deliver the presents, after I had excused the smallness of them, as being, though unworthy his acceptance, the largest that our profession of poverty, and distance from our country, allowed us to make, he examined them one by one with a dissatisfied look, and told me that however he might be pleased with our good attentions, he thought our present such as could not be offered to a king without affronting him; and made me a sign with his hand to withdraw, and take back what I had brought.