after-effect

(redirected from after-effects)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

after-effect

noun (usually plural) consequence, wake, trail, aftermath, hangover (informal), spin-off, repercussion, afterglow, aftershock, delayed response He was suffering from shock as well as from the after-effects of drugs.
Translations

after-effect

[ˈɑːftərɪfekt] Nconsecuencia f after-effects [of treatment] → efectos mpl secundarios; [of illness, operation, accident] → secuelas fpl

after-effect

[ˈɑːftərɪfɛkt] n (of events) → ripercussione f, conseguenza; (of drug) → reazione f; (of illness, experience) → postumi mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone's generosity and dedication is inspirational, especially considering some grieve or face life-changing after-effects from meningitis.
OLYMPIC 400 metre hurdles semi-finalist Jack Green has announced he will not participate in the 2014 World Class Performance Programme (WCPP) due to the after-effects of depression.
This eye-popping, special-effects laden new sci-fi drama is set on Earth in 2046, when humans are living with the after-effects of an invasion by aliens called Votans 30 years previously.
Five years on, Victoria says Daniel, now 10, is still suffering the after-effects of the often deadly disease and believes it has changed his life.
One in three youngsters who are treated for the disease will suffer after-effects including mental health problems, epilepsy and learning difficulties, the study found.
An 8-year prison sentence is provided for torture crimes without after-effects, and 12 years in prison in case where acts of torture leave traces.
6 billion pounds after battling the after-effects of the March earthquake and security hacking scandal.
The airline chief financial officer, Erno Hilden, said 'Demand is on a growth track, but we are still suffering to some extent from the after-effects of the cabin staff strike.
At the Meningitis Trust we are constantly reminded how devastating meningitis can be; changing people's lives in an instant and leaving some with life-long after-effects.
Those who survive can be left with devastating after-effects including loss of hearing, sight, brain damage and, where septicaemia (blood poisoning) has occurred, loss of limbs.
These after-effects last a lifetime and impact on all aspects of day-to-day life for the individual aswell as their family, friends and colleagues.
The research highlights the need for developing stricter assessment methods to ensure vision problems are detected and appropriately identified as the after-effects of stroke as opposed to a symptom of old age.