afternoons


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afternoons

(ˌɑːftəˈnuːnz)
adv
informal during the afternoon, esp regularly

af•ter•noons

(ˌæf tərˈnunz, ˌɑf-)

adv.
in or during any or every afternoon: He slept late and worked afternoons.
[1895–1900, Amer.]
References in classic literature ?
As spring came on, a new set of amusements became the fashion, and the lengthening days gave long afternoons for work and play of all sorts.
Sometimes on summer afternoons she came out of the house and got into her carriage.
Pontellier, and often she took her sewing and went over to sit with her in the afternoons.
Fate has no happiness in store for you; unless your quiet home in the old family residence with the faithful Hepzibah, and your long summer afternoons with Phoebe, and these Sabbath festivals with Uncle Venner and the daguerreotypist, deserve to be called happiness
When school hours were over, he was even the companion and playmate of the larger boys; and on holiday afternoons would convoy some of the smaller ones home, who happened to have pretty sisters, or good housewives for mothers, noted for the comforts of the cupboard.
Or why, irrespective of all latitudes and longitudes, does the name of the White Sea exert such a spectralness over the fancy, while that of the Yellow Sea lulls us with mortal thoughts of long lacquered mild afternoons on the waves, followed by the gaudiest and yet sleepiest of sunsets?
That first night at the wedding Tamoszius had hardly taken his eyes off her; and later on, when he came to find that she had really the heart of a baby, her voice and her violence ceased to terrify him, and he got the habit of coming to pay her visits on Sunday afternoons.
I've worked sometimes whole afternoons, trimming her caps, and getting her ready to go to a party.
They walked about the streets and the wooded hills, they drove in cabs, they boated on the river, they sipped beer and coffee, afternoons, in the Schloss gardens.
I can play from half past four to supper and after supper a little bit and Saturday afternoons.
Not one in a hundred would weep at losing a relation they had just seen twice, for two afternoons.
After a short pause for repose, Miss Skiffins - in the absence of the little servant who, it seemed, retired to the bosom of her family on Sunday afternoons - washed up the tea-things, in a trifling lady-like amateur manner that compromised none of us.