ageratum


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ageratum: Ageratum houstonianum

ag·er·a·tum

 (ăj′ə-rā′təm)
n.
1. Any of various tropical American plants of the genus Ageratum in the composite family, especially A. houstonianum, cultivated for their fluffy blue, purple, pink, or white flower heads.
2. Any of several other plants having flower clusters similar to those of ageratum.

[New Latin Agēratum, genus name, from Greek agēraton, a plant (perhaps a type of rosemary), neuter of agēratos, ageless : a-, without; see a-1 + gēras, old age; see gerə- in Indo-European roots.]

ageratum

(ˌædʒəˈreɪtəm)
n
(Plants) any tropical American plant of the genus Ageratum, such as A. houstonianum and A. conyzoides, which have thick clusters of purplish-blue flowers
[C16: New Latin, via Latin from Greek agēraton that which does not age, from a-1 + gērat-, stem of gēras old age; the flowers of the plant remain vivid for a long time]

ag•er•a•tum

(ˌædʒ əˈreɪ təm, əˈdʒɛr ə-)

n.
any of several low-growing composite plants of the genus Ageratum, having heart-shaped leaves and dense, blue or white flower heads.
[1560–70; < New Latin; Latin agēraton < Greek agḗraton, neuter of agḗratos unaging]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ageratum - rhizomatous plant of central and southeastern United States and West Indies having large showy heads of clear blue flowersageratum - rhizomatous plant of central and southeastern United States and West Indies having large showy heads of clear blue flowers; sometimes placed in genus Eupatorium
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
2.ageratum - any plant of the genus Ageratum having opposite leaves and small heads of blue or white flowersageratum - any plant of the genus Ageratum having opposite leaves and small heads of blue or white flowers
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
genus Ageratum - genus of tropical American herbs grown for their flowers
Ageratum houstonianum, common ageratum - small tender herb grown for its fluffy brushlike blue to lavender blooms
References in periodicals archive ?
rufo-sericeae c d c c Non-endemic native plants Ageratum conyzoides c Alternanthera echinocephala c Blechum pyramidatum c Boerhaavia caribaea c c c c Bursera graveolens d d d Commelina diffusa c Commicarpus tuberosus c Cordia lutea d c d c Cryptocarpus pyriformis c c c Cyperus confertus c Eragrostis ciliaris c Kyllinga brevifolia s Maytenus octogona c c Panicum dichotomiflorum c P.
Several workers throughout the world have carried out anti-microbial studies on some medicinal plants including Datura metel, Ageratum houstonianum [5].
For containers and flower beds or borders, my favourite plants are Ageratum (fluffy mauve-blue flowers on short stems), Antirrhinums (snap-dragons for children - dead head for the best performance), Begonia semperflorens (summer long masses of red, white and pink flowers), Cleome (the spider flower to give height to a display), Dianthus (choose a good one to add scent to the display), Gaillardia (for those really hot, sunny patios), Bedding Pelargoniums (sold as Geraniums - superb flower colours), Lobelia (huge variety of flower colours to act as a background to other bolder plants, Bedding Nemesia (annuals that flower their heads off), Nicotiana (scented flowers in their thousands).
Usually seeds the size of beans, squash, sunflowers and corn present no difficulty, whereas the dust-like seeds of begonias, ageratum and petunia can present more of a challenge.
1000/10000 Tagetes, Salvia 500/5000, Impatiens 100/1000, Coleus 100/1000, ageratum 100/1000, Irizinia 100/1000, Begonia 6000/60000, 1 contr subsecv val.
Acaricidal activity was reported from essential oils from leaves and flowers of Ageratum houstonianum, Origanum onites and O.
Have you considered lifting, potting and moving ageratum, browallia, lobelia or marigold (only the French or Mexican please) indoors to extend their bloom for some weeks or months.
Isolation of stigmasterol and 3-sitosterol from petrolum ether extract of parts of ageratum of Ageratum conyzoides.
Aegle and palmarosa oils inhibited 21 bacteria; patchouli and ageratum oils inhibited 20 bacteria and citronella and geranium oils were inhibitory to 15 and 12 bacterial strains, respectively.
The flowers put on display included Gypsophila, Gamolepis, Acroclinium, Anchusa, Ageratum, Aster, Alyssum, Antirrhinum, Calendula, Candytuft, Corn Flower, Cineraria, Clarkia, Dianthus, Dimorphotheca, English Daisy, Gazania, and Helichrysum.