aggravated


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Related to aggravated: aggravated assault, Aggravated robbery

ag·gra·vate

 (ăg′rə-vāt′)
tr.v. ag·gra·vat·ed, ag·gra·vat·ing, ag·gra·vates
1. To make worse or more troublesome: aggravate political tensions; aggravate a medical condition.
2. To annoy or exasperate: The child's whining aggravated me. See Synonyms at annoy.

[Latin aggravāre, aggravāt- : ad-, ad- + gravāre, to burden (from gravis, heavy; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots).]

ag′gra·vat′ing·ly adv.
ag′gra·va′tive adj.
ag′gra·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Aggravate comes from the Latin verb aggravāre, which meant "to make heavier," that is, "to add to the weight of." It also had the extended senses "to burden" or "to oppress." On the basis of this etymology, it is claimed by some that aggravate should not be used to mean "to irritate, annoy, rouse to anger." But such senses for the word date back to the 17th century and are pervasive. In our 2005 survey, 83 percent of the Usage Panel accepted this usage in the sentence: It's the endless wait for luggage that aggravates me the most about air travel. This was a significant increase from the 68 percent who accepted the same sentence in 1988.

aggravated

(ˈæɡrəˌveɪtɪd)
adj
(Law) law (of a criminal offence) made more serious by its circumstances

ag•gra•vat•ed

(ˈæg rəˌveɪ tɪd)

adj.
Law. characterized by some feature that makes the crime more serious: aggravated assault.
[1540–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aggravated - made more severe or intense especially in law; "aggravated assault"
intense - possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree; "intense heat"; "intense anxiety"; "intense desire"; "intense emotion"; "the skunk's intense acrid odor"; "intense pain"; "enemy fire was intense"
2.aggravated - incited, especially deliberately, to angeraggravated - incited, especially deliberately, to anger; "aggravated by passive resistance"; "the provoked animal attacked the child"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"
Translations

aggravated

[ˈægrəveɪtɪd] adj
(LAW) aggravated assault → coups mpl et blessures fpl
aggravated burglary → cambriolage m avec voies de fait
aggravated robbery → vol m avec voies de fait
aggravated murder → meurtre m avec préméditation
(= annoyed) [person] → exaspéré(e)
References in classic literature ?
The bread burned black, for the salad dressing so aggravated her that she could not make it fit to ear.
Everything he did was rough, and I began to hate him; he wanted to make me afraid of him, but I was too high-mettled for that, and one day when he had aggravated me more than usual I bit him, which of course put him in a great rage, and he began to hit me about the head with a riding whip.
Then she would be so aggravated with that subject that she wouldn't say another word about it, nor let anybody else.
Not to give a slave enough to eat, is regarded as the most aggravated development of meanness even among slaveholders.
This fidgety anxiety about his keys and his cupboards might be the result of the inbred restlessness of his disposition, aggravated in a naturally active man by the aimless indolence of a life in retirement -- a life drifting backward and forward among trifles, with no regular employment to steady it at any given hour of the day.
The energy which had at once supported him under his old sufferings and aggravated their sharpness, had been gradually restored to him.
That cruel man with the wooden leg aggravated my sufferings.
I think the Romans must have aggravated one another very much, with their noses.
The belief that he repented his marriage, and suffered from it, only aggravated her vindictiveness.
He instantly relapsed into an aggravated phase of Smilash.
I slept about two hours, and dreamt I was at home with my wife and children, which aggravated my sorrows when I awaked, and found myself alone in a vast room, between two and three hundred feet wide, and above two hundred high, lying in a bed twenty yards wide.
The gentleness of the first part of the speech contrasts with the aggravated, almost threatening, tone of the conclusion.