aggravating


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ag·gra·vate

 (ăg′rə-vāt′)
tr.v. ag·gra·vat·ed, ag·gra·vat·ing, ag·gra·vates
1. To make worse or more troublesome: aggravate political tensions; aggravate a medical condition.
2. To annoy or exasperate: The child's whining aggravated me. See Synonyms at annoy.

[Latin aggravāre, aggravāt- : ad-, ad- + gravāre, to burden (from gravis, heavy; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots).]

ag′gra·vat′ing·ly adv.
ag′gra·va′tive adj.
ag′gra·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Aggravate comes from the Latin verb aggravāre, which meant "to make heavier," that is, "to add to the weight of." It also had the extended senses "to burden" or "to oppress." On the basis of this etymology, it is claimed by some that aggravate should not be used to mean "to irritate, annoy, rouse to anger." But such senses for the word date back to the 17th century and are pervasive. In our 2005 survey, 83 percent of the Usage Panel accepted this usage in the sentence: It's the endless wait for luggage that aggravates me the most about air travel. This was a significant increase from the 68 percent who accepted the same sentence in 1988.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aggravating - making worseaggravating - making worse        
intensifying - increasing in strength or intensity

aggravating

adjective
1. (Informal) annoying, provoking, irritating, teasing, galling, exasperating, vexing, irksome You don't realise how aggravating you can be.
2. worsening, exaggerating, intensifying, heightening, exacerbating, magnifying, inflaming Stress is a frequent aggravating factor.
Translations

aggravating

[ˈægrəveɪtɪŋ] ADJ
1. (Jur) → agravante
2. (= annoying) → molesto
he's an aggravating childes un niño molesto
it's very aggravatinges para volverse loco

aggravating

[ˈægrəveɪtɪŋ] adj (= annoying) [person] → exaspérant(e)

aggravating

adjärgerlich, enervierend (geh); childlästig, enervierend (geh); how aggravating for youwie ärgerlich für Sie!

aggravating

[ˈægrəveɪtɪŋ] adjesasperante, irritante
References in classic literature ?
Her tone and manner angered Amy, who began to put her boots on, saying, in her most aggravating way, "I shall go.
Well, it took my mind off from every- thing else; took it clear off, and centered it in my helmet; and mile after mile, there it stayed, imagining the handkerchief, picturing the handkerchief; and it was bitter and aggravating to have the salt sweat keep trickling down into my eyes, and I couldn't get at it.
Ignorant people think it's the NOISE which fighting cats make that is so aggravating, but it ain't so; it's the sickening grammar they use.
How can you be so aggravating,' said my mother, shedding more tears than before, 'as to talk in such an unjust manner
With almost impersonal approval he noticed the perfect co-ordination of the boy's muscles, his insatiable curiosity about machinery and his fondness for animals; all of which only made his pronounced distaste for work just that much more aggravating.
He apologized, though, and said, "'Pon my soul it is aggravating, but I cahn't help it--I have got so used to speaking nothing but French, my dear Erbare--damme there it goes again
Oh, but I do know, as it happens," said the clerk in an aggravating manner.
I do think that, of all the silly, irritating tomfoolishness by which we are plagued, this "weather-forecast" fraud is about the most aggravating.
He had so often gone over in his mind the possibility of explaining everything without aggravating appearances that would tell, perhaps unfairly, against Bulstrode, and had so often decided against it--he had so often said to himself that his assertions would not change people's impressions-- that Dorothea's words sounded like a temptation to do something which in his soberness he had pronounced to be unreasonable.
At thought of him her face would become almost hard, which seems incredible, and she would knit her lips and fold her arms, and reply with a stiff 'oh' if you mentioned his aggravating name.
He was in the prime of life, but very bald--had been in the army and the coal trade--wore very stiff collars and prodigiously long wristbands--seldom laughed, but talked with remarkable glibness, and was never known to lose his temper under the most aggravating circumstances of prison existence.
cried Fanny, with the impatient poke which is peculiarly aggravating to masculine dignity.