aggravation


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ag·gra·va·tion

 (ăg′rə-vā′shən)
n.
1. The act of aggravating or the state of being aggravated.
2. A source of continuing, increasing irritation or trouble.
3. Exasperation.

ag•gra•va•tion

(ˌæg rəˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an increase in intensity, seriousness, or severity; act of making worse.
2. the state of being aggravated.
3. something that causes an increase in intensity, degree, or severity.
4. annoyance; exasperation.
5. a source or cause of annoyance or exasperation.
[1475–85; < Medieval Latin]
usage: See aggravate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aggravation - an exasperated feeling of annoyanceaggravation - an exasperated feeling of annoyance
vexation, annoyance, chafe - anger produced by some annoying irritation
2.aggravation - unfriendly behavior that causes anger or resentmentaggravation - unfriendly behavior that causes anger or resentment
aggro - (informal British usage) aggravation or aggression; "I skipped it because it was too much aggro"
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
last straw - the final irritation that stretches your patience beyond the limit
taunt, taunting, twit - aggravation by deriding or mocking or criticizing
3.aggravation - action that makes a problem or a disease (or its symptoms) worseaggravation - action that makes a problem or a disease (or its symptoms) worse; "the aggravation of her condition resulted from lack of care"
intensification - action that makes something stronger or more extreme

aggravation

noun
1. (Informal) annoyance, grief (informal), teasing, irritation, hassle (informal), provocation, gall, exasperation, vexation, irksomeness I just couldn't take the aggravation.
2. worsening, heightening, inflaming, exaggeration, intensification, magnification, exacerbation Any aggravations of the injury would keep him out of the match.

aggravation

noun
Translations
تَفَاقُم، زِيَادَة سُوء أو خُطُورَة
hněvrozčílenízhoršení
ærgrelseirritation
elmérgesedéselmérgesítéssúlyosbítássúlyosbodás
áreiting, íòynging
darıltmakızdırmaşiddetlendirme

aggravation

[ˌægrəˈveɪʃən] N
1. (= exacerbation) [of problem, situation, illness] → agravación f, empeoramiento m
2. (= annoyance) → irritación f
3. (Jur) → circunstancia f agravante
robbery with aggravationrobo m agravado

aggravation

[ˌægrəˈveɪʃən] n (= annoyance) → contrariété f

aggravation

n
(= worsening)Verschlimmerung f
(= annoyance)Ärger m; she was a constant aggravation to himsie reizte ihn ständig

aggravation

[ægrəˈveɪʃn] n (of situation) → aggravamento, peggioramento; (annoyance) → esasperazione f, irritazione f

aggravate

(ˈӕgrəveit) verb
1. to make worse. His bad temper aggravated the situation.
2. to make (someone) angry or impatient. She was aggravated by the constant questions.
ˌaggraˈvation noun
References in classic literature ?
It proved to be a great aggravation of Hester's offenses, in the eyes of Hester's relatives, when it was discovered that she possessed a life-interest in Salt Patch, and an income of two hundred a year.
But, perhaps, this is one reason which hath determined me to act in a milder manner with you: for, as no private resentment should ever influence a magistrate, I will be so far from considering your having deposited the infant in my house as an aggravation of your offence, that I will suppose, in your favour, this to have proceeded from a natural affection to your child, since you might have some hopes to see it thus better provided for than was in the power of yourself, or its wicked father, to provide for it.
The necessity of concealing from her mother and Marianne, what had been entrusted in confidence to herself, though it obliged her to unceasing exertion, was no aggravation of Elinor's distress.
Meanwhile, councils went on in the kitchen at home, fraught with almost insupportable aggravation to my exasperated spirit.
Nevertheless, granting the original sin of the situation, and given this unforeseen development, even I failed to see how Raffles could have combined greater humanity with any regard for our joint safety; and had his barbarities ended here, I for one should not have considered them an extraordinary aggravation of an otherwise minor offence.
But it is frenzy to repeat these thoughts to you: only it will let you know why, with a reluctance to be always alone, his society is no benefit; rather an aggravation of the constant torment I suffer: and it partly contributes to render me regardless how he and his cousin go on together.
The fifth of their number alone tarried in the lists long enough to be greeted by the applauses of the spectators, amongst whom he retreated, to the aggravation, doubtless, of his companions' mortification.
I remember, when I was once interceding with the emperor for a criminal who had wronged his master of a great sum of money, which he had received by order and ran away with; and happening to tell his majesty, by way of extenuation, that it was only a breach of trust, the emperor thought it monstrous in me to offer as a defence the greatest aggravation of the crime; and truly I had little to say in return, farther than the common answer, that different nations had different customs; for, I confess, I was heartily ashamed.
Now it seems nothing; yet it is an heavy aggravation.
The old folk of our grandfathers' young days sang a song bearing exactly the same burden; and the young folk of to-day will drone out precisely similar nonsense for the aggravation of the next generation.
We had played at Gibraltar with balls the size of a walnut, on a table like a public square--and in both instances we achieved far more aggravation than amusement.
While she was in full enjoyment of this last aggravation of the horrors of the prospect, Emily tried another change of position--and, this time, with success.