aggravate

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ag·gra·vate

 (ăg′rə-vāt′)
tr.v. ag·gra·vat·ed, ag·gra·vat·ing, ag·gra·vates
1. To make worse or more troublesome: aggravate political tensions; aggravate a medical condition.
2. To annoy or exasperate: The child's whining aggravated me. See Synonyms at annoy.

[Latin aggravāre, aggravāt- : ad-, ad- + gravāre, to burden (from gravis, heavy; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots).]

ag′gra·vat′ing·ly adv.
ag′gra·va′tive adj.
ag′gra·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Aggravate comes from the Latin verb aggravāre, which meant "to make heavier," that is, "to add to the weight of." It also had the extended senses "to burden" or "to oppress." On the basis of this etymology, it is claimed by some that aggravate should not be used to mean "to irritate, annoy, rouse to anger." But such senses for the word date back to the 17th century and are pervasive. In our 2005 survey, 83 percent of the Usage Panel accepted this usage in the sentence: It's the endless wait for luggage that aggravates me the most about air travel. This was a significant increase from the 68 percent who accepted the same sentence in 1988.

aggravate

(ˈæɡrəˌveɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to make (a disease, situation, problem, etc) worse or more severe
2. informal to annoy; exasperate, esp by deliberate and persistent goading
[C16: from Latin aggravāre to make heavier, from gravis heavy]
ˈaggraˌvating adj
ˈaggravatingly adv
ˌaggraˈvation n

ag•gra•vate

(ˈæg rəˌveɪt)

v.t. -vat•ed, -vat•ing.
1. to make worse or more severe; intensify, as anything evil, disorderly, or troublesome.
2. to annoy; irritate; exasperate.
3. to cause to become irritated or inflamed.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin aggravātus, past participle of aggravāre to weigh down, make worse]
ag′gra•va`tor, n.
usage: The two most common senses of the verb aggravate are “to make worse” and “to annoy, exasperate.” Both senses, and the corresponding senses of the noun aggravation, appeared in the early 17th century at almost the same time and have been standard since then. The noun and verb senses “to annoy” and “annoyance” are sometimes objected to, and used somewhat less frequently than “to make worse” in formal speech and writing.

aggravate


Past participle: aggravated
Gerund: aggravating

Imperative
aggravate
aggravate
Present
I aggravate
you aggravate
he/she/it aggravates
we aggravate
you aggravate
they aggravate
Preterite
I aggravated
you aggravated
he/she/it aggravated
we aggravated
you aggravated
they aggravated
Present Continuous
I am aggravating
you are aggravating
he/she/it is aggravating
we are aggravating
you are aggravating
they are aggravating
Present Perfect
I have aggravated
you have aggravated
he/she/it has aggravated
we have aggravated
you have aggravated
they have aggravated
Past Continuous
I was aggravating
you were aggravating
he/she/it was aggravating
we were aggravating
you were aggravating
they were aggravating
Past Perfect
I had aggravated
you had aggravated
he/she/it had aggravated
we had aggravated
you had aggravated
they had aggravated
Future
I will aggravate
you will aggravate
he/she/it will aggravate
we will aggravate
you will aggravate
they will aggravate
Future Perfect
I will have aggravated
you will have aggravated
he/she/it will have aggravated
we will have aggravated
you will have aggravated
they will have aggravated
Future Continuous
I will be aggravating
you will be aggravating
he/she/it will be aggravating
we will be aggravating
you will be aggravating
they will be aggravating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been aggravating
you have been aggravating
he/she/it has been aggravating
we have been aggravating
you have been aggravating
they have been aggravating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been aggravating
you will have been aggravating
he/she/it will have been aggravating
we will have been aggravating
you will have been aggravating
they will have been aggravating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been aggravating
you had been aggravating
he/she/it had been aggravating
we had been aggravating
you had been aggravating
they had been aggravating
Conditional
I would aggravate
you would aggravate
he/she/it would aggravate
we would aggravate
you would aggravate
they would aggravate
Past Conditional
I would have aggravated
you would have aggravated
he/she/it would have aggravated
we would have aggravated
you would have aggravated
they would have aggravated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.aggravate - make worseaggravate - make worse; "This drug aggravates the pain"
irritate - excite to an abnormal condition, or chafe or inflame; "Aspirin irritates my stomach"
inflame - cause inflammation in; "The repetitive motion inflamed her joint"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
cheapen, degrade - lower the grade of something; reduce its worth
2.aggravate - exasperate or irritateaggravate - exasperate or irritate    
anger - make angry; "The news angered him"

aggravate

verb
1. make worse, exaggerate, intensify, worsen, heighten, exacerbate, magnify, inflame, increase, add insult to injury, fan the flames of Stress and lack of sleep can aggravate the situation.
make worse improve, ease, calm, smooth, diminish, lessen, alleviate, mitigate, assuage
2. (Informal) annoy, bother, provoke, needle (informal), irritate, tease, hassle (informal), gall, exasperate, nettle, pester, vex, irk, get under your skin (informal), get on your nerves (informal), nark (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), get up your nose (informal), be on your back (slang), piss you off (taboo slang), rub (someone) up the wrong way (informal), get in your hair (informal), get on your wick (Brit. slang) What aggravates you most about this country?
annoy please, calm, assuage, pacify

aggravate

verb
1. To make greater in intensity or severity:
2. To trouble the nerves or peace of mind of, especially by repeated vexations:
Idioms: get in one's hair, get on one's nerves, get under one's skin.
Translations
يَزِيد المَوْقِف سُوء أو خُطُورَةيُغِيظ، يُثِير سَخْطَاً
rozčílitrozlobitzhoršit
ærgreforværreirritere
súlyosbít
ergjagera verra
bloginimasblogintipabloginimaspablogintipykinimas
pasliktinātsakaitinātsaniknot
zhoršiť
ağırlaştırmakkızdırmakkötüleştirmek

aggravate

[ˈægrəveɪt] VT
1. (= make worse) → agravar
2. (= annoy) → irritar, sacar de quicio

aggravate

[ˈægrəveɪt] vt
[+ situation, problem, tensions] → aggraver
(= annoy) [+ person] → exaspérer, agacer

aggravate

vt
(= make worse)verschlimmern
(= annoy)aufregen; (deliberately) → reizen; don’t get aggravatedregen Sie sich nicht auf

aggravate

[ˈægrəveɪt] vtaggravare, peggiorare; (annoy) → esasperare, irritare

aggravate

(ˈӕgrəveit) verb
1. to make worse. His bad temper aggravated the situation.
2. to make (someone) angry or impatient. She was aggravated by the constant questions.
ˌaggraˈvation noun

aggravate

vt. agravar, empeorar, irritar.

aggravate

vt agravar, empeorar
References in classic literature ?
We know that the bitter drops, which even you have drained from the cup, are no incidental aggravations, no individual ills, but such as must mingle always and necessarily in the lot of every slave.
This situation continued a month, and with new aggravations and particular notes, the note above all, sharper and sharper, of the small ironic consciousness on the part of my pupils.
To hear that provoking precious little scream when the chair was hoisted on its poles, and to catch that transient but not-to-be-forgotten vision of the happy face within-- what torments and aggravations, and yet what delights were these
It proved to be a great aggravation of Hester's offenses, in the eyes of Hester's relatives, when it was discovered that she possessed a life-interest in Salt Patch, and an income of two hundred a year.
But, perhaps, this is one reason which hath determined me to act in a milder manner with you: for, as no private resentment should ever influence a magistrate, I will be so far from considering your having deposited the infant in my house as an aggravation of your offence, that I will suppose, in your favour, this to have proceeded from a natural affection to your child, since you might have some hopes to see it thus better provided for than was in the power of yourself, or its wicked father, to provide for it.
The necessity of concealing from her mother and Marianne, what had been entrusted in confidence to herself, though it obliged her to unceasing exertion, was no aggravation of Elinor's distress.
Meanwhile, councils went on in the kitchen at home, fraught with almost insupportable aggravation to my exasperated spirit.
Nevertheless, granting the original sin of the situation, and given this unforeseen development, even I failed to see how Raffles could have combined greater humanity with any regard for our joint safety; and had his barbarities ended here, I for one should not have considered them an extraordinary aggravation of an otherwise minor offence.
But it is frenzy to repeat these thoughts to you: only it will let you know why, with a reluctance to be always alone, his society is no benefit; rather an aggravation of the constant torment I suffer: and it partly contributes to render me regardless how he and his cousin go on together.
The fifth of their number alone tarried in the lists long enough to be greeted by the applauses of the spectators, amongst whom he retreated, to the aggravation, doubtless, of his companions' mortification.