aggregated


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ag·gre·gate

 (ăg′rĭ-gĭt)
adj.
1. Constituting or amounting to a whole; total: aggregate sales in that market.
2. Botany Crowded or massed into a dense cluster.
3. Composed of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
n.
1. A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount: "An empire is the aggregate of many states under one common head" (Edmund Burke).
2. The mineral materials, such as sand or stone, used in making concrete.
v. (-gāt′) ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates
v.tr.
1. To gather into a mass, sum, or whole: aggregated the donations into one bank account.
2. To amount to; total: Revenues will aggregate more than one million dollars.
3. To collect (content from different sources on the internet) into one webpage or newsreader.
v.intr.
To come together or collect in a mass or whole: "Some [bacteria]aggregate so closely as to mimic a multicellular organism" (Gina Kolata). "The first stars began to form when hydrogen and helium gas left over from the Big Bang aggregated into dense clouds" (Paul Davies).
Idiom:
in the aggregate
Taken into account as a whole: Unit sales for December amounted in the aggregate to 100,000.

[Middle English aggregat, from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre, to add to : ad-, ad- + gregāre, to collect (from grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

ag′gre·gate·ly adv.
ag′gre·ga′tion n.
ag′gre·ga′tive adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aggregated - formed of separate units gathered into a mass or whole; "aggregate expenses include expenses of all divisions combined for the entire year"; "the aggregated amount of indebtedness"
collective - forming a whole or aggregate
References in classic literature ?
Because, as has been elsewhere noticed, those whales, influenced by some views to safety, now swim the seas in immense caravans, so that to a large degree the scattered solitaries, yokes, and pods, and schools of other days are now aggregated into vast but widely separated, unfrequent armies.
These latter cells are nearly spherical and of nearly equal sizes, and are aggregated into an irregular mass.
Hence it would continually be more and more advantageous to our humble-bee, if she were to make her cells more and more regular, nearer together, and aggregated into a mass, like the cells of the Melipona; for in this case a large part of the bounding surface of each cell would serve to bound other cells, and much wax would be saved.

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