aghast


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a·ghast

 (ə-găst′)
adj.
Struck by shock, terror, or amazement.

[Middle English agast, past participle of agasten, to frighten : a-, intensive pref. (from Old English ā-) + gasten, to frighten (from Old English gǣstan, from gāst, ghost).]

aghast

(əˈɡɑːst)
adj
(postpositive) overcome with amazement or horror
[C13: agast, from Old English gæstan to frighten. The spelling with gh is on the model of ghastly]

a•ghast

(əˈgæst, əˈgɑst)

adj.
struck with overwhelming shock or amazement; filled with sudden fright or horror.
[1225–75; Middle English agast frightened, past participle of agasten=a- a-3 + gasten, Old English gǣstan to frighten]

aghast

- From a verb agastea, "frighten," based on an Old English word meaning "torment."
See also related terms for torment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aghast - struck with fear, dread, or consternationaghast - struck with fear, dread, or consternation
afraid - filled with fear or apprehension; "afraid even to turn his head"; "suddenly looked afraid"; "afraid for his life"; "afraid of snakes"; "afraid to ask questions"

aghast

adjective horrified, shocked, amazed, stunned, appalled, astonished, startled, astounded, confounded, awestruck, horror-struck, thunder-struck His colleagues were aghast at the sackings.

aghast

adjective
Filled with fear or terror:
Regional: afeard, ascared.
Translations
مَذْعُور، مَشْدُوه
zděšený
forfærdet
skelfingu lostinn
apstulbintas
apstulbotspārsteigts
zdesený
dehşete kapılmışdona kalmış

aghast

[əˈgɑːst] ADJhorrorizado, pasmado (at ante) to be aghast athorrorizarse or pasmarse ante

aghast

[əˈgɑːst] adjatterré(e), accablé(e)
aghast at sth [+ behaviour, situation] → atterré(e) par qch, accablé(e) par qch
Beth was aghast at what she had just heard → Beth était atterrée par ce qu'elle venait juste d'entendre., Beth était accablée par ce qu'elle venait juste d'entendre.
aghast at being ... → atterré d'être ..., accablé d'être ...
He was aghast at being classed a traitor → Il était atterré d'être considéré comme un traître., Il était accablé d'être considéré comme un traître.

aghast

adj predentgeistert (→ at über +acc)

aghast

[əˈgɑːst] adj aghast (at) (shocked) → sbigottito/a (a); (terrified) → inorridito/a (a), atterrito/a (a)
to be aghast at the idea of doing sth → essere atterrito/a all'idea di fare qc

aghast

(əˈgaːst) adjective
struck with horror. She was aghast at the mess.
References in classic literature ?
The rustic driver, stupefied and aghast, stood looking at the wagon, and did nothing but utter loud cries to Hercules to come and help him.
The Judge left the Court, looking deeply disgusted: But the Snark, though a little aghast, As the lawyer to whom the defense was entrusted, Went bellowing on to the last.
Aghast, he dropped the manuscript among the chessmen and stared in bewilderment round the room.
He was aghast at his hesitation and, trying to arouse his former devotional feeling, prostrated himself before the Gates of the Temple.
But when a serious emergency tried the metal of which she was really made, the people who were loudest in laughing at her stood aghast, and wondered what had become of the familiar companion of their everyday lives.
Quick, Bildad, said Peleg, his partner, who, aghast at the close vicinity of the flying harpoon, had retreated towards the cabin gangway.
Then lighting a fire upon the ground they hacked morsels from the bird, and proceeded to roast them while I stood by aghast.
All the village and all who heard of it were amazed at the affair; I was aghast, Anselmo thunderstruck, her father full of grief, her relations indignant, the authorities all in a ferment, the officers of the Brotherhood in arms.
As their astonished gaze fell upon the hundreds of green warriors, who now came forth from the fighting shelters, they stopped aghast, but at sight of Kantos Kan, who advanced to meet them, they came forward, crowding about him.
For a minute perhaps I stared aghast at this blackness that was creeping over the day, and then I realized that an eclipse was beginning.
The poor fellow stood for a moment, bewildered and aghast, then dropping his traps, wheeled and made off at full speed, quickened by a sportive volley which the Indians rattled after him.
MILLWARD,' I exclaimed, in a tone of wrathful menace that made the reverend gentleman look round - aghast - astounded at such unwonted insolence, and stare me in the face, with a look that plainly said, 'What, this to me