agitate


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ag·i·tate

 (ăj′ĭ-tāt′)
v. ag·i·tat·ed, ag·i·tat·ing, ag·i·tates
v.tr.
1. To cause to move with violence or sudden force.
2. To upset; disturb: was agitated by the alarming news.
3. To arouse interest in (a cause, for example) by use of the written or spoken word; discuss or debate.
v.intr.
To stir up public interest in a cause: agitate for a tax reduction.

[Latin agitāre, agitāt-, frequentative of agere, to drive, do; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

ag′i·tat′ed·ly (-tā′tĭd-lē) adv.
ag′i·ta′tive adj.
Synonyms: agitate, churn, convulse, rock2, shake
These verbs mean to cause to move to and fro violently: surface water agitated by the boat's propeller; a storm churning the waves; buildings convulsed by an explosion; a hurricane rocking trees and houses; an earthquake that shook the ground.

agitate

(ˈædʒɪˌteɪt)
vb
1. (tr) to excite, disturb, or trouble (a person, the mind, or feelings); worry
2. (tr) to cause to move vigorously; shake, stir, or disturb
3. (intr; often foll by for or against) to attempt to stir up public opinion for or against something
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (tr) to discuss or debate in order to draw attention to or gain support for (a cause, etc): to agitate a political cause.
[C16: from Latin agitātus, from agitāre to move to and fro, set into motion, from agere to act, do]
ˈagiˌtated adj
ˈagiˌtatedly adv

ag•i•tate

(ˈædʒ ɪˌteɪt)

v. -tat•ed, -tat•ing. v.t.
1. to move or force into violent, irregular action.
2. to shake or move briskly.
3. to disturb or excite emotionally; perturb.
4. to call attention to by speech or writing; discuss; debate.
v.i.
5. to arouse or attempt to arouse public interest and support, as in a political or social cause.
[1580–90; < Latin agitātus, past participle of agitāre frequentative of agere to drive, do, act]

agitate


Past participle: agitated
Gerund: agitating

Imperative
agitate
agitate
Present
I agitate
you agitate
he/she/it agitates
we agitate
you agitate
they agitate
Preterite
I agitated
you agitated
he/she/it agitated
we agitated
you agitated
they agitated
Present Continuous
I am agitating
you are agitating
he/she/it is agitating
we are agitating
you are agitating
they are agitating
Present Perfect
I have agitated
you have agitated
he/she/it has agitated
we have agitated
you have agitated
they have agitated
Past Continuous
I was agitating
you were agitating
he/she/it was agitating
we were agitating
you were agitating
they were agitating
Past Perfect
I had agitated
you had agitated
he/she/it had agitated
we had agitated
you had agitated
they had agitated
Future
I will agitate
you will agitate
he/she/it will agitate
we will agitate
you will agitate
they will agitate
Future Perfect
I will have agitated
you will have agitated
he/she/it will have agitated
we will have agitated
you will have agitated
they will have agitated
Future Continuous
I will be agitating
you will be agitating
he/she/it will be agitating
we will be agitating
you will be agitating
they will be agitating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been agitating
you have been agitating
he/she/it has been agitating
we have been agitating
you have been agitating
they have been agitating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been agitating
you will have been agitating
he/she/it will have been agitating
we will have been agitating
you will have been agitating
they will have been agitating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been agitating
you had been agitating
he/she/it had been agitating
we had been agitating
you had been agitating
they had been agitating
Conditional
I would agitate
you would agitate
he/she/it would agitate
we would agitate
you would agitate
they would agitate
Past Conditional
I would have agitated
you would have agitated
he/she/it would have agitated
we would have agitated
you would have agitated
they would have agitated

agitate

To gently shake the contents of a pan.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.agitate - try to stir up public opinionagitate - try to stir up public opinion  
provoke, stimulate - provide the needed stimulus for
rumpus - cause a disturbance
2.agitate - cause to be agitated, excited, or rousedagitate - cause to be agitated, excited, or roused; "The speaker charged up the crowd with his inflammatory remarks"
hype up, psych up - get excited or stimulated; "The children were all psyched up after the movie"
disturb, trouble, upset - move deeply; "This book upset me"; "A troubling thought"
bother - make nervous or agitated; "The mere thought of her bothered him and made his heart beat faster"
pother - make upset or troubled
electrify - excite suddenly and intensely; "The news electrified us"
calm, still, tranquilize, tranquillise, tranquillize, calm down, quiet, quieten, lull - make calm or still; "quiet the dragons of worry and fear"
3.agitate - exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or personagitate - exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for; "The liberal party pushed for reforms"; "She is crusading for women's rights"; "The Dean is pushing for his favorite candidate"
advertize, advertise, promote, push - make publicity for; try to sell (a product); "The salesman is aggressively pushing the new computer model"; "The company is heavily advertizing their new laptops"
4.agitate - move very slightlyagitate - move very slightly; "He shifted in his seat"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
5.agitate - move or cause to move back and forthagitate - move or cause to move back and forth; "The chemist shook the flask vigorously"; "My hands were shaking"
fluff up, plump up, shake up - make fuller by shaking; "fluff up the pillows"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
fan - agitate the air
tremble - move or jerk quickly and involuntarily up and down or sideways; "His hands were trembling when he signed the document"
tremor, quake - shake with seismic vibrations; "The earth was quaking"
palpitate - cause to throb or beat rapidly; "Her violent feelings palpitated the young woman's heart"
convulse - shake uncontrollably; "earthquakes convulsed the countryside"
sparge - agitate by introducing air or compressed gas; "sparge the water"
succuss, shake up - shake; especially (a patient to detect fluids or air in the body)
concuss - shake violently
rattle - shake and cause to make a rattling noise
jactitate, thrash about, thresh, thresh about, thrash, convulse, toss, slash - move or stir about violently; "The feverish patient thrashed around in his bed"
jiggle, joggle, wiggle - move to and fro; "Don't jiggle your finger while the nurse is putting on the bandage!"
6.agitate - change the arrangement or position ofagitate - change the arrangement or position of
scramble, beat - stir vigorously; "beat the egg whites"; "beat the cream"
toss - agitate; "toss the salad"
rile, roil - make turbid by stirring up the sediments of
poke - stir by poking; "poke the embers in the fireplace"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"

agitate

verb
1. protest, campaign, push, demonstrate, drive, crusade, cry out The women had begun to agitate for better conditions.
2. stir, beat, mix, shake, disturb, toss, rouse, churn Gently agitate the water with a paintbrush.
3. upset, worry, trouble, disturb, excite, alarm, stimulate, distract, rouse, ruffle, inflame, incite, unnerve, disconcert, disquiet, fluster, perturb, faze, work someone up, give someone grief (Brit. & S. African) The thought of them inheriting all these things agitated her.
upset still, quiet, calm, soothe, calm down, appease, placate, assuage, pacify, quieten, mollify, tranquillize

agitate

verb
1. To cause to move to and fro violently:
2. To impair or destroy the composure of:
Informal: rattle.
Translations
يُثِير المَوْضُوع، يُنَاقِشيُحَرِّك، يَهُزيُقْلِق، يُثِير، يُهِيج المَشَاعِر
agitovatvzrušitzmítatzneklidnit
agitereforuroligegøre nervøsryste
agitál
hrista, ÿfakoma úr jafnvægireka áróîur fyrir
agitatoriusagituotikelti nerimąpurtytisukelti nerimą
aģitētsakratītsapurinātsatrauktuzbudināt
endişelendirmekkamuoyunun ilgisini çekmeye çalışmakkaygılandırmaksallamak

agitate

[ˈædʒɪteɪt]
A. VT
1. (= excite, upset) → inquietar, perturbar
2. (= shake) → agitar
B. VI (Pol) to agitate for sthhacer campaña en pro de algo
to agitate against sthhacer campaña en contra de algo

agitate

[ˈædʒɪteɪt]
vt
(= worry) [+ person] → perturber
[+ liquid] → remuer; [+ molecules] → agiter
vi (politically)faire de l'agitation politique
to agitate for sth (= campaign for) → faire campagne pour qch
to agitate against sth (= campaign against) → faire campagne contre qch

agitate

vt
(lit) liquidaufrühren; surface of wateraufwühlen; washinghin und her bewegen
(fig: = excite, upset) → aufregen, aus der Fassung bringen; don’t let him agitate youlass dich von ihm nicht aufregen
viagitieren; to agitate for somethingsich für etw starkmachen

agitate

[ˈædʒɪteɪt]
1. vt (perturb) → turbare, mettere in (uno stato di) agitazione; (shake) → agitare
2. vi (Pol) to agitate (for/against)fare un'agitazione (per/contro)

agitate

(ˈӕdʒiteit) verb
1. to make (someone) excited and anxious. The news agitated her.
2. to try to arouse public feeling and action. That group is agitating for prison reform.
3. to shake. The tree was agitated by the wind.
ˈagitated adjective
ˌagiˈtation noun
ˈagitator noun
a person who tries constantly to stir up public feeling. a political agitator.

agitate

vt. [to shake] agitar, sacudir; [to upset] inquietar, perturbar.
References in classic literature ?
Those multitudes presently began to agitate for another miracle.
It was an alarming change; and Emma was thinking of it one morning, as what must bring a great deal to agitate and grieve her, when Mr.
Elinor had heard enough, if not to gratify her vanity, and raise her self-importance, to agitate her nerves and fill her mind;--and she was therefore glad to be spared from the necessity of saying much in reply herself, and from the danger of hearing any thing more from her brother, by the entrance of Mr.
Why should you agitate yourself to no purpose by reading them?
Further, to enable me to cast this variety of subjects somewhat into the shade, and to express my judgment regarding them with greater freedom, without being necessitated to adopt or refute the opinions of the learned, I resolved to leave all the people here to their disputes, and to speak only of what would happen in a new world, if God were now to create somewhere in the imaginary spaces matter sufficient to compose one, and were to agitate variously and confusedly the different parts of this matter, so that there resulted a chaos as disordered as the poets ever feigned, and after that did nothing more than lend his ordinary concurrence to nature, and allow her to act in accordance with the laws which he had established.
We are not to conclude too hastily, however, that faction did not, in a certain degree, agitate the particular cities; much less that a due subordination and harmony reigned in the general system.
My dear,' said he to Esther, 'you must not agitate yourself.
He had scarcely entered when he began to agitate his nose and his jaws after the example of his clerks.