agitative


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ag·i·tate

 (ăj′ĭ-tāt′)
v. ag·i·tat·ed, ag·i·tat·ing, ag·i·tates
v.tr.
1. To cause to move with violence or sudden force.
2. To upset; disturb: was agitated by the alarming news.
3. To arouse interest in (a cause, for example) by use of the written or spoken word; discuss or debate.
v.intr.
To stir up public interest in a cause: agitate for a tax reduction.

[Latin agitāre, agitāt-, frequentative of agere, to drive, do; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

ag′i·tat′ed·ly (-tā′tĭd-lē) adv.
ag′i·ta′tive adj.
Synonyms: agitate, churn, convulse, rock2, shake
These verbs mean to cause to move to and fro violently: surface water agitated by the boat's propeller; a storm churning the waves; buildings convulsed by an explosion; a hurricane rocking trees and houses; an earthquake that shook the ground.

agitative

(ˈædʒɪtətɪv)
adj
tending to stir or agitate
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.agitative - causing or tending to cause anger or resentmentagitative - causing or tending to cause anger or resentment; "a provoking delay at the airport"
provocative - serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate; stimulating discussion or exciting controversy; "a provocative remark"; "a provocative smile"; "provocative Irish tunes which...compel the hearers to dance"- Anthony Trollope
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our people are very agitative and they are waiting in the wings for a marching order and once this order is given, nothing can reverse it.
He said political unrest and agitative politics could harm the conducive environment of economic development and stability in the country.
Other issues such as depression, agitative body signals, suicidal tendencies
The story could have been a modern adaptation of Ibsen or Odets because it bears all the hallmarks of classic agitative theatre.