agnostic


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ag·nos·tic

 (ăg-nŏs′tĭk)
n.
1.
a. One who believes that it is impossible to know whether there is a God.
b. One who is skeptical about the existence of God but does not profess true atheism.
2. One who is doubtful or noncommittal about something.
adj.
1. Relating to or being an agnostic.
2. Doubtful or noncommittal: "Though I am agnostic on what terms to use, I have no doubt that human infants come with an enormous 'acquisitiveness' for discovering patterns" (William H. Calvin).
3. Computers Operable or functioning using any operating system or other digital technology. Often used in combination: software that is platform agnostic.

[a- + Gnostic.]

ag·nos′ti·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Agnostics do not deny the existence of God—instead, they hold that one cannot know for certain whether or not God exists. The term agnostic was coined by the 19th-century British scientist Thomas H. Huxley, who believed that only material phenomena were objects of exact knowledge. He made up the word from the prefix a-, meaning "without, not," as in amoral, and the noun Gnostic. Gnostic is related to the Greek word gnōsis, "knowledge," which was used by early Christian writers to mean "higher, esoteric knowledge of spiritual things"; hence, Gnostic referred to those with such knowledge. In coining the term agnostic, Huxley was considering as "Gnostics" a group of his fellow intellectuals—"ists," as he called them—who had eagerly embraced various doctrines or theories that explained the world to their satisfaction. Because he was a "man without a rag of a label to cover himself with," Huxley coined the term agnostic for himself, its first published use being in 1870.

agnostic

(æɡˈnɒstɪk)
n
1. (Theology) a person who holds that knowledge of a Supreme Being, ultimate cause, etc, is impossible. Compare atheist, theist
2. a person who claims, with respect to any particular question, that the answer cannot be known with certainty
adj
of or relating to agnostics
[C19: coined 1869 by T. H. Huxley from a-1 + gnostic]
agˈnosticism n

ag•nos•tic

(ægˈnɒs tɪk)

n.
1. a person who holds that the existence of the ultimate cause, as a god or God, and the essential nature of things are unknown and unknowable.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to agnostics or agnosticism.
[1869; < Greek ágnōst(os), variant of ágnōtos not known (a- a-6 + gnōtós known, v. adj. of gignṓskein to know) + -ic, after gnostic]
ag•nos′ti•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See atheist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agnostic - someone who is doubtful or noncommittal about something
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.agnostic - a person who claims that they cannot have true knowledge about the existence of God (but does not deny that God might exist)
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
Adj.1.agnostic - of or pertaining to an agnostic or agnosticism
2.agnostic - uncertain of all claims to knowledge
gnostic - possessing intellectual or esoteric knowledge of spiritual things

agnostic

noun sceptic, cynic, scoffer, doubter, disbeliever, unbeliever, doubting Thomas, Pyrrhonist He was, if not an atheist, an agnostic.
Translations
агностик
agnostik
agnostikkoagnostinen
agnostičkiagnostik
agnostisk
agnostiker

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk]
A. ADJagnóstico
B. Nagnóstico/a m/f

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk]
nagnostique mf
adjagnostique

agnostic

adjagnostisch
nAgnostiker(in) m(f)

agnostic

[ægˈnɒstɪk] adj & nagnostico/a
References in classic literature ?
He proclaimed him- self an agnostic and was so absorbed in destroying the ideas of God that had crept into the minds of his neighbors that he never saw God manifesting himself in the little child that, half forgotten, lived here and there on the bounty of her dead mother's relatives.
The stranger began to babble and made a prophecy concerning the child that lay in the arms of the agnostic.
My gay American horizons were bathed in the vast melancholy of the Slav, patient, agnostic, trustful.
But such reaction was effective only because an age had come--the age of a negative, or agnostic philosophy--in which men's minds must needs be limited to the superficialities of things, with a kind of narrowness amounting to a positive gift.
Then there was a black-eyed restaurant waiter who was a theosophist, a union baker who was an agnostic, an old man who baffled all of them with the strange philosophy that WHAT IS IS RIGHT, and another old man who discoursed interminably about the cosmos and the father-atom and the mother-atom.
His engagement with Miss Eleanor Siddal, a milliner's apprentice (whose face appears in many of his pictures), was prolonged by his lack of means for nine years; further, he was an agnostic, while she held a simple religious faith, and she was carrying on a losing struggle with tuberculosis.
If a miracle happened in your office, you'd have to hush it up, now so many bishops are agnostics.
Unlike other Enterprise File Sync and Share products the SME product is storage agnostic and works with a mix of existing public cloud data and on-premise cloud data.
Among atheists/agnostics, 94 percent knew what an atheist was and 86 percent knew what it meant to be agnostic For those who identify as "nothing in particular," 82 percent correctly defined atheism, while only 60 percent knew what agnosticism meant.
To Be An Agnostic: An Agnostic Approach to Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness" discusses agnosticism as a philosophy, extending it from religion to a pursuit of knowledge.
AN agnostic and a Muslim are among the composers chosen to write music for the Pope's new album, it was announced yesterday.
The three composers chosen to write eight new works are Briton Simon Boswell, an agnostic, Stefano Mainetti from Italy, who is Catholic, and Nour Eddine, from Morocco, who is Muslim.