agones


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a·gon·es

 (ə-gō′nēz)
n.
Plural of agon.
References in classic literature ?
Marooned three years agone," he continued, "and lived on goats since then, and berries, and oysters.
Yonder woman, Sir, you must know, was the wife of a certain learned man, English by birth, but who had long ago dwelt in Amsterdam, whence some good time agone he was minded to cross over and cast in his lot with us of the Massachusetts.
some two and forty years agone the good count rode hence to fight for Holy Cross, and many a year hath flown since word or token have we had of him.
Beyond is the cemetery--long, winding galleries hewn out of the solid rock, with recesses on either hand, wherein, tier above tier, lie the revolutionists just as they were laid away by their comrades long years agone.
They were looking at the Four Winds Harbor of sixty years agone, with a battered old ship sailing through the sunrise splendor.
It may be best to go, lad, after all; for, if the shot hangs under the skin, my hand is getting too old to be cutting into human flesh, as I once used to, Though some thirty years agone, in the old war, when I was out under Sir William, I travelled seventy miles alone in the howling wilderness, with a rifle bullet in my thigh, and then cut it out with my own jack-knife.
The clock of the Old South was striking as I came through Boston, and that is full fifteen minutes agone.
Then straightway the Knight told all about his stay at Denby and of the happening at the fair, and how it was like to go hard with young David; so he told his tale, and quoth he, "It was this, good Robin, that kept me so late on the way, otherwise I would have been here an hour agone.
Instead, she saw the Kingsport Harbor of nearly a century agone.
Sometimes, centuries agone, it seemed to her it was since Billy had gone to jail.
But, Ishmael, what have you been killing, my man; for it was your rifle I heard a few minutes agone, unless I have lost my skill in sounds.
Years agone, when the object of his affections was wont to sit in her little arm-chair by the high Lodge-fender, Young John (family name, Chivery), a year older than herself, had eyed her with admiring wonder.