aground


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

a·ground

 (ə-ground′)
adv. & adj.
1. Onto or on a shore, reef, or the bottom of a body of water: a ship that ran aground; a ship aground offshore.
2. On the ground: combat aircraft aloft and aground.

aground

(əˈɡraʊnd)
adv, adj
(postpositive) on or onto the ground or bottom, as in shallow water

a•ground

(əˈgraʊnd)

adv., adj.
1. with the bottom stuck on the ground beneath a body of water; stranded: The ship ran aground.
2. on or onto the ground.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aground - stuck in a place where a ship can no longer float; "a ship aground offshore"; "a boat aground on the beach waiting for the tide to lift it"
afloat - borne on the water; floating
Adv.1.aground - with the bottom lodged on the groundaground - with the bottom lodged on the ground; "he ran the ship aground"

aground

adverb beached, grounded, stuck, shipwrecked, foundered, stranded, ashore, marooned, on the rocks, high and dry The 40ft Lady Gwendoline was aground and taking in water.
Translations
مُرْتَطِم بِالأرْض قَاع البَحْر
na mělčinu
grundstødt
strandaîur
ant seklumos
uz sēkļa
na plytčine
karaya oturmuş

aground

[əˈgraʊnd] ADV (Naut) to be agroundestar encallado or varado
to run agroundencallar
to run a ship agroundvarar un barco, hacer que encalle un barco

aground

[əˈgraʊnd] adv
to run aground [boat] → s'échouer
to run aground [plans] → échouer

aground

adj pred shipgestrandet, aufgelaufen, auf Grund gelaufen
adv to go or run agroundauflaufen, auf Grund laufen, stranden

aground

[əˈgraʊnd] adv (Naut) → in secca
to run aground → arenarsi, incagliarsi

aground

(əˈgraund) adjective, adverb
(of ships) (stuck) on the bed of the sea etc in shallow water. Our boat ran aground.
References in classic literature ?
I see I'd got to invent a bar, or forget the name of the one we got aground on -- or -- Now I struck an idea, and fetched it out:
The Lascar pretended that six years before, during a stay at Vanikoro, he had seen two Europeans that belonged to some vessels that had run aground on the reefs some years ago.
The fact must be that a commander cannot possibly shave himself when his ship is aground.
You just start to beat out, the two of you, and all you have to do is miss stays in the same baffling puff and the current will set you nicely aground.
I shall not trouble the reader with the particulars of this fight, in which, though the English commander ran himself aground, we lost three of our ships, and with great difficulty escaped with the rest into the port of Mosambique.
We was four days getting out of the "upper river," because we got aground so much.
But when the bellringer, dishevelled and panting, had deposited her in the cell of refuge, when she felt his huge hands gently detaching the cord which bruised her arms, she felt that sort of shock which awakens with a start the passengers of a vessel which runs aground in the middle of a dark night.
But when I came to the ship my difficulty was still greater to know how to get on board; for, as she lay aground, and high out of the water, there was nothing within my reach to lay hold of.
The bull seed William, and took after him, horns aground, begad; and though William runned his best, and hadn't MUCH drink in him
I ordered sufficient water let into the diving-tanks to lower us about a foot, and then I ran the bow slowly toward the shore, confident that should we run aground, we still had sufficient lifting force to free us when the water should be pumped out of the tanks; but the bow nosed its way gently into the reeds and touched the shore with the keel still clear.
In a third a zig-zag wall went up into the sky like a flash of lightning, and a bird with two tails was apparently brooding over a fisherman whose boat was just going aground upon the moon.
In another part, two large vessels anchored near together were whirled about, and their cables were thrice wound round each other; though anchored at a depth of 36 feet, they were for some minutes aground.