ague


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Related to ague: malaria, cloven, terpsichore

a·gue

 (ā′gyo͞o)
n.
1. A febrile condition in which there are alternating periods of chills, fever, and sweating. Used chiefly in reference to the fevers associated with malaria.
2. A chill or fit of shivering.

[Middle English, from Old French (fievre) ague, sharp (fever), from Medieval Latin (febris) acūta, from Latin, feminine of acūtus; see acute.]

a′gu·ish (ā′gyo͞o-ĭsh) adj.
a′gu·ish·ly adv.
a′gu·ish·ness n.

ague

(ˈeɪɡjuː)
n
1. (Medicine) a fever with successive stages of fever and chills esp when caused by malaria
2. a fit of shivering
[C14: from Old French (fievre) ague acute fever; see acute]
ˈaguish adj
ˈaguishly adv

a•gue

(ˈeɪ gyu)

n.
1. chills, fever, and sweating associated with malaria.
2. any fever marked by shivering.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle French, short for fievre ague acute fever < Latin febris acūta]
a′gu•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ague - a fit of shivering or shakingague - a fit of shivering or shaking  
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
2.ague - successive stages of chills and fever that is a symptom of malariaague - successive stages of chills and fever that is a symptom of malaria
malaria - an infective disease caused by sporozoan parasites that are transmitted through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito; marked by paroxysms of chills and fever
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
quartan - a malarial fever that recurs every fourth day
3.ague - a mark (') placed above a vowel to indicate pronunciation
accent mark, accent - a diacritical mark used to indicate stress or placed above a vowel to indicate a special pronunciation
Translations

ague

(archaic) [ˈeɪgjuː] Nfiebre f intermitente

ague

nSchüttelfrost m no art
References in classic literature ?
Heathcliff, having stared his son into an ague of confusion, uttered a scornful laugh.
It was a great jest of his, I recollect, to pretend that he couldn't keep his teeth from chattering, whenever mention was made of an Alguazill in connexion with the adventures of Gil Blas; and I remember that when Gil Blas met the captain of the robbers in Madrid, this unlucky joker counterfeited such an ague of terror, that he was overheard by Mr.
Maybe you don't count it nothing to have a real college doctor to see you every day--you, John, with your head broke--or you, George Merry, that had the ague shakes upon you not six hours agone, and has your eyes the colour of lemon peel to this same moment on the clock?
We had a very prosperous gale, till we arrived at the Cape of Good Hope, where we landed for fresh water; but discovering a leak, we unshipped our goods and wintered there; for the captain falling sick of an ague, we could not leave the Cape till the end of March.
And as for Arthur, he fell to trembling, and finally was shaken with doubt as with an ague.
La Carconte muttered a few inarticulate words, then let her head again drop upon her knees, and went into a fit of ague, leaving the two speakers to resume the conversation, but remaining so as to be able to hear every word they uttered.
He opened at once his little eyes and his great mouth, to inhale better the joke his eminence deigned to address to him, and ended by a burst of laughter, so violent that his great limbs shook in hilarity as they would have done in an ague.
Byles beheld this figure on the staircase, he shivered as with an ague, but continued to watch him steadfastly, until the gouty gentleman had reached the threshold, made a gesture of anguish and despair, and vanished into the outer gloom, whither the funeral music summoned him.
The bee hunter is generally some settler on the verge of the prairies; a long, lank fellow, of fever and ague complexion, acquired from living on new soil, and in a hut built of green logs.
But we decided to undertake it, though, for my own part, I felt little prepared to encounter its fatigues, shivering and burning by turns with the ague and fever; for I know not how else to describe the alternate sensations I experienced, and suffering not a little from the lameness which afflicted me.
The heat rapidly increased, and once again I looked up, shuddering as with a fit of the ague.
Whatever cross-accidents had occurred to intercept the pleasures of her nieces, she had found a morning of complete enjoyment; for the housekeeper, after a great many courtesies on the subject of pheasants, had taken her to the dairy, told her all about their cows, and given her the receipt for a famous cream cheese; and since Julia's leaving them they had been met by the gardener, with whom she had made a most satisfactory acquaintance, for she had set him right as to his grandson's illness, convinced him that it was an ague, and promised him a charm for it; and he, in return, had shewn her all his choicest nursery of plants, and actually presented her with a very curious specimen of heath.