air embolism


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Related to air embolism: pulmonary embolism

air embolism

or

aeroembolism

n
(Medicine) the presence in the tissues and blood of a gas, such as air or nitrogen bubbles, caused by an injection of air or, in the case of nitrogen, by an abrupt and substantial reduction in the ambient pressure. See decompression sickness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.air embolism - obstruction of the circulatory system caused by an air bubble as, e.g., accidentally during surgery or hypodermic injection or as a complication from scuba divingair embolism - obstruction of the circulatory system caused by an air bubble as, e.g., accidentally during surgery or hypodermic injection or as a complication from scuba diving
embolism - occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus (a loose clot or air bubble or other particle)
2.air embolism - pain resulting from rapid change in pressureair embolism - pain resulting from rapid change in pressure
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
References in periodicals archive ?
All steps in catheter removal are important in preventing pulmonary air embolism.
Air embolism is one of the most sudden conditions to arise which would bring a fatal result.
Forensic divers may experience additional risks, including hypothermia, hyperthermia, air embolism, and dehydration.
Depth changes without adequate time for the divers to equalize pressure in internal air spaces could result in barotrauma, air embolism, or other related problems.
Improved safety for patients and healthcare workers, by reducing the risk of accidental needlestick, guidewire and air embolism, contaminated components, and splash contamination.
reportedly due to uterine perforation during device placement, one death related to an air embolism during device removal surgery.
2]O risk complications such as interstitial emphysema and air embolism (8).
The American Hospital Association supports the inclusion of only three of the conditions outlined by CMS (an object left in during surgery, air embolism, and blood incompatibility).
The potential complications of percutaneous venous catheterizations are various and include pneumothorax, subclavian and carotid artery puncture, hematoma, air embolism, catheter malposition, catheter fragment embolization, venous thrombosis, infection and problems of guidewires (1).
Two of the most notable problems associated with rapid ascents while diving are; decompression sickness (the bends) and air embolism.
The air should have gone into a tube leading to the baby's stomach but he injected it into a venous drip by mistake causing a fatal air embolism.
The most serious potential complications of the technique are the introduction of an air embolism and perforation of any of the involved vascular structures.