airs


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air

 (âr)
n.
1.
a. A colorless, odorless, tasteless, gaseous mixture, mainly nitrogen (approximately 78 percent) and oxygen (approximately 21 percent) with lesser amounts of argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, helium, and other gases.
b. This mixture with varying amounts of moisture and particulate matter, enveloping the earth; the atmosphere.
2.
a. The sky; the firmament.
b. A giant void; nothingness: The money vanished into thin air.
3. An atmospheric movement; a breeze or wind.
4. Sports A height achieved by a jump or as part of an airborne maneuver, as in skateboarding or snowboarding: getting big air off the halfpipe; had big airs on every run down the course.
5. Aircraft: send troops to Europe by air.
6.
a. Public utterance; vent: gave air to their grievances.
b. The medium of broadcast radio or television: "often ridiculed ... extremist groups on air" (Christian Science Monitor).
7.
a. A manner of behaving that conveys an impression: a leader with an air of conviction.
b. A distinctive quality or appearance; an aura: The messy room had an air of desperation to it.
c. The general environment or condition, as in attitudes and ideas: growing impatience in the air.
d. airs Affected behavior; affectation: put on airs. See Synonyms at affectation.
8. Music
a. A melody or tune, especially in the soprano or tenor range.
b. A solo with or without accompaniment.
9. Air conditioning.
10. Archaic Breath.
v. aired, air·ing, airs
v.tr.
1. To expose to the air in order to dry, cool, or freshen; ventilate.
2. To make known to others; express publicly: aired my complaints. See Synonyms at voice.
3. To broadcast on television or radio: "The ad was submitted to CBS ... which accepted and aired it" (New York).
v.intr.
To be broadcast on television or radio: "tidbits that will air on tonight's 6 o'clock news" (Terry Ann Knopf).
adj.
1. Of or relating to the air or the movement of air: an air tube.
2. Existing or living in the air; aerial.
3. Powered by compressed air: an air horn.
4. Containing or inflated by air.
5. Of or relating to aircraft or aeronautics.
6. Of or relating to the broadcast or transmission of radio or television signals.
7. Imaginary or unreal: "The guy had just hit it big ... after ten years of eating air sandwiches" (Jonathan Kellerman).
Idioms:
air one out
Football To throw a long pass.
in the air
Abroad; prevalent: Excitement was in the air.
up in the air
Not yet decided; uncertain.

[Partly from Middle English air, gas, atmosphere (from Old French, from Latin āēr, from Greek; see wer- in Indo-European roots) and partly from French air, nature, quality, place of origin (from Latin ager, place, field; see agriculture, and Latin ārea, open space, threshing floor; see area). N., sense 8, from French air, tune, from Italian aria; see aria.]

airs

(ɛəz)
pl n
affected manners intended to impress others (esp in the phrases give oneself airs, put on airs)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.airs - affected manners intended to impress othersairs - affected manners intended to impress others; "don't put on airs with me"
affectedness - the quality of being false or artificial (as to impress others)
References in classic literature ?
But Adam did not need it, Nor the plough he would not speed it, Singing:--"Earth and Water, Air and Fire, What more can mortal man desire?
So I believe the best way to get across the desert will be through the air.
There now remained only the question of air; for allowing for the consumption of air by Barbicane, his two companions, and two dogs which he proposed taking with him, it was necessary to renew the air of the projectile.
Would he obtain air by chemical means, in getting by heat the oxygen contained in chlorate of potash, and in absorbing carbonic acid by caustic potash?
The top of the buggy caught the air like a parachute or an umbrella filled with wind, and held them back so that they floated downward with a gentle motion that was not so very disagreeable to bear.
But air, air, that is what they will soon want; so quick, quick
At the outset, in order not to give the balloon too ponderous dimensions, he had decided to fill it with hydrogen gas, which is fourteen and a half times lighter than common air.
She caught herself with a quick beat of wings, fluttered about undecidedly for a space, then rose in the air.
The youngest, who was the slave of his passions and of a very uncertain temper, became Prince of the Air.
Every one knows that by the peculiar cunning of their gills, the finny tribes in general breathe the air which at all times is combined with the element in which they swim, hence, a herring or a cod might live a century, and never once raise its head above the surface.
The overseer wouldn't believe him when he said the valley air would be his death--and the negroes, who might otherwise have helped him, all avoided a man whom they knew to be under a spell.
When Zarathustra spake these sayings, he stood nigh to the entrance of his cave; with the last words, however, he slipped away from his guests, and fled for a little while into the open air.