airtightness

airtightness

(ˈɛətaɪtnəs)
n
the quality of being airtight
References in periodicals archive ?
The airtightness of the building is measured in the course of its completion.
Building methods that ensure airtightness and good ventilation, combined with the use of low-VOC (volatile organic compounds) finishes, provide a level of indoor air quality known to improve respiratory health, concentration and productivity.
Originating in Germany in the 1980s, the certification requires a building to comply with strict energy-usage caps and pass an onsite airtightness test.
Airtightness was also monitored and analysed every hour during the six month build.
Airtightness requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code change by location.
To qualify for Passive House certification, a building must meet stringent criteria, including space heating and cooling demands, primary energy demands, airtightness, thermal comfort requirements and more.
Second, no exterior humid air into the attic to cause ducts to sweat and a huge increase in airtightness of the entire assembly, reducing part-load humidity problems and providing a huge thermal benefit.
There are 11 inches of insulation made from recycled paper, and the airtightness of the construction cuts out draughts and cold air getting in.
Proctor Group introduced Wraptite, an external air barrier to solve the problem of reliably achieving airtightness in buildings.
While the team take into account the traditional Passivhaus elements of "excellent thermal performance, exceptional airtightness with mechanical ventilation," the ambition of MULTICOMFORT sets a new precedent by combining sustainable design with both the health and well-being of building users by incorporating acoustic comfort, improved air quality and visual comfort through daylighting design.
They're famously fast to erect and enjoy excellent levels of insulation - and, importantly, make it easy to achieve high levels of airtightness.